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Logging

Logging

Logging is the cutting, skidding, on-site processing, and loading of trees or logs onto trucks or skeleton cars.In forestry, the term logging is sometimes used in a narrow sense concerning the logistics of moving wood from the stump to somewhere outside the forest, usually a sawmill or a lumber yard

 

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The report analyzed data from more than 100 studies of tropical forests on three continents that had been harvested for timber. Results suggest that while biodiversity and carbon retention take a hit from selective logging, the losses are survivable and reversible to a degree if the forest is given adequate time to recover

Article: Science News
Source: Logging of tropical fores...

Selective logging may be one of the few feasible options left for conserving tropical forests given the huge financial incentives pushing tropical landholders to convert primary forests into cash-generating agricultural plantations.

Article: Science News
Source: Logging of tropical fores...

Illegal logging occurs in all types of forests, across all continents, from Brazil to Canada, Cameroon to Kenya, and from Indonesia to Russia, destroying nature and wildlife, damaging communities and distorting trade.

Article: Illegal logging
Source: WWF

In the late 1990s, after depleting much of their own timber stocks, Asian logging companies began aggressively moving into rainforest areas including northeastern South America (Guyana, Suriname); the Brazilian Amazon; the Congo Basin of Central Africa; the South Pacific, particularly the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea; and Central America

Article: Logging in the Rainforest
Source: Logging in the Rainforest

Logging is one of the most prominent and best-known forms of rainforest degradation and destruction. Despite improved logging techniques and greater international awareness and concern for the rainforests, unsustainable logging of tropical rainforests continues—much of it practiced illegally by criminal syndicates.

Article: Logging in the Rainforest
Source: Logging in the Rainforest

The report estimates that illegal logging accounts for as much as 90% of all timber felled each year, generating between $10 to $15 billion. The report says the logging is mostly controlled by organized crime, and ill-gotten gains are used to pay corrupt government officials at all levels to turn a blind eye.

Article: World Bank: Football fiel...
Source: CNN.com

A new World Bank study on illegal logging reports that a football field of forest is clear-cut every two seconds around the globe and the problem is now a "global epidemic."

Article: World Bank: Football fiel...
Source: CNN.com

The report estimates that illegal logging accounts for as much as 90% of all timber felled each year, generating between $10 to $15 billion. The report says the logging is mostly controlled by organized crime, and ill-gotten gains are used to pay corrupt government officials at all levels to turn a blind eye.

Article: World Bank: Football fiel...
Source: CNN.com

In order to combat illegal logging, we must work closely with the timber industry. That is why WWF created the Global Forest & Trade Network (GFTN), a global partnership comprised of suppliers, producers and purchasers from across the forest industry supply chain that are willing to lead the industry in sustainable forest management and trade.

Article: Stopping illegal logging ...
Source: WWF

Illegal logging doesn't only concern people who depend on forests or endangered animals such as elephants and orangutans.

It also involves governments and consumers around the world who purchase timber products.

Article: Stopping illegal logging ...
Source: WWF
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