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Methods of dog training

Methods of dog training

Positive reinforcement and positive punishment are two different methods of dog training. However, positive reinforcement is generally viewed as the more modern and humane method of training in comparison to positive punishment which is viewed as outdated and inhumane.

 

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Emily Prins

Emily Prins

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We provide evidence that, in the general dog-owning population, dogs trained using punishment are no more obedient than those trained by other means and, furthermore, they exhibit increased numbers of potentially problematic behaviours.
 

Article:   Dog training methods: the…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

Traditional trainers believe that an owner must establish dominance over his or her dog - which, depending on the size and temperament of the pooch, may involve choking, hitting and screaming at it.

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As you begin the process of modifying your dog’s behavior, BE PATIENT. Positive training relies on consistency, repetition and the following general rules:

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Source: Animal

The study found that rule structure was important in achieving a well-behaved dog, but appears to be dependent on a low level of punishment in the training program.

Article: Positive Reinforcement in...
Source: The Bark

Positive training helps to establish and maintain a connection that increases trust and therefore creates a stronger bond between dog and owner, because if your dog feels good about you, he will be a happier, more confident and better-behaved dog.

Article: Victoria Stilwell Positiv...
Source: Victoria Stilwell Positiv...
Emily Prins

Emily Prins

13 Knowledge Cards 

Often, using positive reinforcement builds a healthy and good relationship between dog and owner. Positive punishment creates a fear based relationship. If a dog views his/her owner as domineering, a healthy relationship is not produced. One could argue that postive punishment creates an obedient dog, but it's a dog who is obedient due to intimidation. However, using positve reinforcement makes a dog associate the owner with rewards and fun, which creates a more willing dog. The key to a successful dog-owner bond is through trust and positive reinforcement. 

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To be effective, punishment must be delivered while your pet is engaged in the undesirable behavior--in other words, "caught in the act." If the punishment is delivered too late, even seconds later, your pet will not associate the punishment with the undesired behavior.

Article: Positive Reinforcement: T...
Source: Pets for LIfe
Emily Prins

Emily Prins

13 Knowledge Cards 

In opposition to positive reinforcement, punishment is seen by many to be inhumane due to the use of physical punishment as training techniques. Another reason many stray away from punishment based training is it's difficulty to execute. Dogs will very easily associate the punishment with another action or circumstance, not neccessarily the one the trainer desires to get rid of. It is very easy for a dog to mistake a trainer's message and reprimand. Therefore, not only does punishment border on inhumane, it is also incredibly difficult to execute. 

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Punishment may also be associated with other stimuli, including people, present at the time the punishment occurs. For example, a dog that is punished for getting too close to a small child may become fearful of or defensive around that child.

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Source: PupLife Dog Supplies

Without a doubt, one of the most common problems people have when using PR is not being thoughtful enough about what their dog defines as reinforcing.

Article:   A treat by Any Other Name…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal
Emily Prins

Emily Prins

13 Knowledge Cards 

Positive reinforcement is helpful but must be tailored to each individual dog. It is an effective and humane training method, however it ceases to be as effective unless the trainer personalizes the reward for the dog. Because it must be altered to work for each individual dog, it can be seen, on one hand, as an inconsistent method for training. On the other hand, it can be viewed as a specialized technique that increases its productiveness and success because of its variety.

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Because punishment induced training can have a variety of adverse effects, it is not recommended by the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior (AVSAB, 2007). Some detrimental effects cited were suppression of other behaviors and aversive associations, such as the handlers becoming punishment predictors to be avoided

Article: Obedience training effect...
Source: ScienceDirect.com

Positive reinforcement training uses praise and/or treats to reward your dog for doing something you want him to do. Because the reward makes him more likely to repeat the behavior, positive reinforcement is one of your most powerful tools for shaping or changing your dog's behavior.

Article: Dogs: Positive Reinforcem...
Source: Dogs: Positive Reinforcem...
Emily Prins

Emily Prins

13 Knowledge Cards 

Positive reinforcement is very common for dog training these days as it growing in comparison to positive punishment. People generally view positive reinforcement as a more modern training method, whereas positive punishment is deemed outdated. With positive reinforcement, dogs are rewarded for good behavior with things they like and are willing to work for, such as play time with toys, petting or special treats. 

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