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Jackson Pollock

Jackson Pollock

Jackson Pollock is a 20th-century American artist, best known for his abstract style of painting.

 

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Sarah Miller

Sarah Miller

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Pollock's name is also associated with the introduction of the All-over style of painting which avoids any points of emphasis or identifiable parts within the whole canvas and therefore abandons the traditional idea of composition in terms of relations among parts. The design of his painting had no relation to the shape or size of the canvas -- indeed in the finished work the canvas was sometimes docked or trimmed to suit the image. All these characteristics were important for the new American painting which matured in the late 1940s and early 1950s.

Article: WebMuseum: Pollock, Jacks...
Source: WebMuseum: Pollock, Jacks...

Pollock's immediate legacy was certainly felt most by other painters. His work brought together elements of Cubism, Surrealism, and Impressionism, and transcended them all. Beside that achievement even greats such as de Kooning, who remained closer to Cubism, and hung on to figurative imagery, seemed to fall short. And the best among subsequent generations of painters would all have to take on his achievement, just as Pollock himself had wrestled with Picasso.

Article: Jackson Pollock Biography...
Source: Jackson Pollock Biography...

At his death, his art was the most consequential and controversial ever to have been produced by an American. Reflecting on the immense success of Pollock's work, his brother Sande offered his thoughts on its beginnings, which might, he said, have prompted a kindly counselor to switch a career change to tennis or plumbing

Article:   Pollock 1912-1956
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

Alcoholism would also to be for blame for Pollock's death, when, on the night of August 11,1956, drunk, he smashed his car into a tree and died. With him perished Edith Metzger, an acquaintance of his then girlfriend, Ruth Klingman, who survived the accident.

Article:   Jackson Pollock
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

Mural is considered by many to be the most important modern American painting ever made. For Mural, Pollock evoked the myriad stylistic techniques and theoretical methodologies to which he had been exposed. He synthesized these elements in the moment and created a painting that is inundated with personal, cultural, social, political, and art-world references: the work of his early mentor Thomas Hart Benton and the Regionalist style; the landscape of the Midwest and Native American imagery and philosophy; commercial art; the Works Progress Association (WPA); Mexican murals, Soviet Social Realism and Marxism; the influence of refugee artists from wartime Europe; Asian calligraphy; African and other non-Western art; film; the explosion of World War II and America's response; Picasso's work, especially Guernica (1937); and Jungian psychotherapy.

Article: Jackson Pollock - Univers...
Source: Jackson Pollock - Univers...

The critic Clement Greenberg, Pollock's principal champion, said he took one look at the painting and realized that "Jackson was the greatest painter this country has produced." A Museum of Modern Art curator, the late Kirk Varnedoe, said Mural established Jackson Pollock as the world's premier modern painter.

Article: Decoding Jackson Pollock ...
Source: Decoding Jackson Pollock ...

He began to study painting in 1929 at the Art Students' League, New York, under the Regionalist painter Thomas Hart Benton. During the 1930s he worked in the manner of the Regionalists, being influenced also by the Mexican muralist painters (Orozco, Rivera, Siqueiros) and by certain aspects of Surrealism. From 1938 to 1942 he worked for the Federal Art Project. By the mid 1940s he was painting in a completely abstract manner, and the `drip and splash' style for which he is best known emerged with some abruptness in 1947.

Article: WebMuseum: Pollock, Jacks...
Source: July 2002

At age eighteen, in the early fall of 1930, Jackson Pollock left Los Angeles and went east, bent on becoming an artist. He had very little going for him other than his vocational fixation - his belief that "being an artist is life itself - living it I mean." This unpromising, uncompromising young man only lived about a quarter of a century longer.

Article:   Jackson Pollock
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

At the age of fifteen, Jackson with his older brother Sanford spent the summer months with a party of land surveyors in the Grand Canyon. There, two of the older men introduced them to drinking. His later alcoholism, probably resulting in part from physical intolerance, would gravely exacerbate the psychological problems that grew out of his father's absence and his mother's coddling, and eventually necessitate several stays in psychiatric stays and a series of therapies.

Article:   Pollock 1912-1956
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

Paul Jackson Pollock was born in Cody, Wyoming, in 1912, the fifth and youngest son of a family of Irish-Scotch extraction. Pollock was only ten months old when the family moved to San Diego. His father's work as a surveyor would force them to move repeatedly around the Southwest in subsequent years, until, when Pollock was aged nine, his father abandoned the family, only to return when Jackson himself had left home. The West of Pollock's childhood provided a tough upbringing, but he grew to love nature - animals and the expanse of the land - and while living in Phoenix in 1923 he discovered Native American art.

Article: Jackson Pollock Biography...
Source: Jackson Pollock Biography...
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