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Kellogg Company

Kellogg Company

The Kellogg Company (NYSE: K; often referred to as Kellogg or Kellogg's in its corporate logo), is a producer of cereal and convenience foods, including cookies, crackers, toaster pastries, cereal bars, fruit-flavored snacks, frozen waffles, and vegetarian foods.

 

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Steven Mills

Steven Mills

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Kellogg offers more cereals with at least a good source of fiber and 8 grams of whole grains than any other U.S. food company.

Article: Kellogg Company Unveils U...
Source: redOrbit

The Manchester plant where Kellogg’s Corn Flakes are made was built in 1938 and is the world’s largest cereal manufacturing plant. It employs 1,000 people, making it one of the largest employers in the city and encompasses 130,000 square feet of floor space.

Article: Did you know?
Source: Kellogg Ireland

A staggering 128 billion bowls of Kellogg's Corn Flakes are eaten worldwide every year in countries as far a field as Guatemala, India, Japan and Argentina.

Article: Did you know?
Source: Kellogg Ireland

In the 1990s, as consumers purchased "On the Go" foods like never before, convenience foods grew as a percentage of Kellogg's sales. Kellogg's® Rice Krispies Treats® squares and Kellogg's® Nutri-Grain® bars won broad consumer acceptance. Kellogg's® Pop-Tarts® toaster pastries became the company's top-selling product.

Article: A Historical Overview
Source: Com

With the advent of pasteurization of milk, the ready-to-eat cereal business expanded. To keep up with a growing market, Kellogg Company developed new product, packaging and marketing innovations to fit consumer needs. In 1914, Kellogg Company created Waxtite® wrappers, a new concept in packaging technology. W.K. Kellogg believed that if people tried a good product, they would keep buying it.

Article: A Historical Overview
Source: Kellogg Company History

Kellogg Co (K.N) agreed to buy Pringles potato chips for $2.7 billion in a cash deal that makes the cereal company second only to PepsiCo Inc (PEP.N) in the global snack food market. The transaction also marks the final exit of household products maker Procter & Gamble Co (PG.N) from the food business after its earlier deal to sell Pringles to Diamond Foods Inc (DMND.O) fell apart.

Article: Kellogg to buy Pringles f...
Source: Reuters

In recent years, Kellogg health claims have prompted government investigations on two occasions. One was in 2009, when the company boasted that Frosted Mini-Wheats could improve the attentiveness of children; the other was a year later, when Rice Krispies were promoted as a way to “support your child’s immunity.” In both cases, the company dropped the claim and signed a settlement order agreeing to stick with the facts in the future.

Article: Kellogg Takes Aim at Snac...
Source: Kellogg Takes Aim at Snac...

Battle Creek, 120 miles west of Detroit, became an unlikely hotbed of commerce thanks to one man: Dr. John Kellogg, a physician who, starting in the late 1800s, ran a sanitarium-cum-health resort that drew visitors from around the world. Dr. Kellogg was a garrulous eccentric with a fondness for unorthodox treatments, like yogurt enemas. He was also a fervent vegetarian who regarded meat as a kind of toxin. The problem was that vegetarian breakfasts were dull. To keep visitors on the meatless path during stays, he and his wife, Ella, began experiments in the sanitarium bakery.

Article: Kellogg Takes Aim at Snac...
Source: Kellogg Takes Aim at Snac...

2006 — The Kellogg Company celebrated our 100-year commitment to nutrition, health and quality. We also celebrated our future — by creating new Kellogg’s® Special K® Bars and other innovative ways of giving your family the delicious nutrition you need to make the most of every day.

Article: Our History
Source: Kellogg's

1898 — In a fortunately failed attempt at making granola, our company’s founder, W.K. Kellogg, and his brother, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, changed breakfast forever when they accidentally flaked wheat berry. W.K. kept experimenting until he flaked corn, and created the delicious recipe for Kellogg’s Corn Flakes.

Article: Our History
Source: Kellogg's
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