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Propoganda

Propoganda

Propaganda is a form of communication that is aimed at influencing the attitude of a community toward some cause or position.

 

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Megan Simmons

Megan Simmons

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Scholars, journalists, and politicians have long argued about how to properly define propaganda and distinguish it from other forms of mass communication. Propaganda is biased information designed to shape public opinion and behavior.

Article: What is Propaganda
Source: United States Holocaust M...

In the 18th and 19th centuries, propaganda took on greater importance in the political realm with the growth of literacy, liberal demands for freedoms of the press, speech, and assembly, and representative governments. Politicians and governments of all types recognized the importance of winning over and molding public opinion through propaganda and other methods of mass persuasion.

Article: What is Propaganda?
Source: United States Holocaust M...

Assertion is commonly used in advertising and modern propaganda. An assertion is an enthusiastic or energetic statement presented as a fact, although it is not necessarily true. They often imply that the statement requires no explanation or back up, but that it should merely be accepted without question

Article: Propaganda Techniques
Source: ThinkQuest : Library

Bandwagon is also one of the seven main propaganda techniques identified by the Institute for Propaganda Analysis in 1938. Bandwagon is an appeal to the subject to follow the crowd, to join in because others are doing so as well. Bandwagon propaganda is, essentially, trying to convince the subject that one side is the winning side, because more people have joined it. The subject is meant to believe that since so many people have joined, that victory is inevitable and defeat impossible.

Article: Propaganda Techniques
Source: ThinkQuest : Library

Testimonial: Propagandists use this technique to associate a respected person or someone with experience to endorse a product or cause by giving it their stamp of approval hoping that the intended audience will follow their example.

Article: Propaganda Techniques
Source: Mason academic research s...

The name-calling technique links a person, or idea, to a negative symbol. The propagandist who uses this technique hopes that the audience will reject the person or the idea on the basis of the negative symbol, instead of looking at the available evidence. The most obvious type of name calling involves bad names

Article: Propaganda Critic: Word g...
Source: Propaganda Critic: Word g...

Transfer is a device by which the propagandist carries over the authority, sanction, and prestige of something we respect and revere to something he would have us accept. For example, most of us respect and revere our church and our nation. If the propagandist succeeds in getting church or nation to approve a campaign in behalf of some program, he thereby transfers its authority, sanction, and prestige to that program. Thus, we may accept something which otherwise we might reject.

Article: Propaganda Critic: False ...
Source: Propaganda Critic: False ...

Plain Folks: Propagandists use this approach to convince the audience that the spokesperson is from humble origins, someone they can trust and who has their interests at heart. Propagandists have the speaker use ordinary language and mannerisms to reach the audience and identify with their point of view

Article: Propaganda Techniques
Source: Mason academic research s...

Card stacking or selective omission. This is the process of choosing from a variety of facts only those which support the propagandist's purpose.In using this technique, facts are selected and presented which most effectively strengthen and authenticate the point of view of the propagandist. It includes the collection of all available material pertaining to a subject and the selection of that material which most effectively supports the propaganda line. Card stacking, case making, and censorship are all forms of selection. Success or failure depends on how successful the propagandist is in selecting facts or "cards" and presenting or "stacking" them.

Article: Propaganda Techniques
Source: Serendipity: Information/...

Glittering generalities are a form of propaganda that elicit strong emotional responses through the use of vague and hollow, though perceptually meaningful, words and phrases. A glittering generality can also act like a shield that protects the source from having to commit to anything certain.

Article: The Writer's Pulse
Source: The Writer's Pulse

A glittering generality can also act like a shield that protects the source from having to commit to anythin

Article: The Writer's Pulse
Source: The Writer's Pulse

If the propaganda or the propagandist lacks naturalness, there may be an adverse backlash. The audience may resent what it considers attempts to mock it, its language, and its ways. Social Disapproval. This is a technique by which the propagandist marshals group acceptance and suggests that attitudes or actions contrary to the one outlined will result in social rejection, disapproval, or outright ostracism. The latter, ostracism, is a control practice widely used within peer groups and traditional societies.

Article: Propaganda Techniques
Source: Serendipity: Information/...

Political propaganda is something entirely different. It uses indeed in part the same methods to reach its goals, but rests on entirely different assumptions. Propaganda is by no means simply commercial advertising applied to the political, or spiritual arena. They seek only momentary effect, whereas political propaganda seeks the systematic enlightenment necessary to win supporters to a worldview.

Article: Modern Political Propagan...
Source: Calvin College - Minds In...

Propaganda deliberately and systematically seeks to achieve a response that furthers the interest and desired intent of the propagandist. The successful propagandist is able to discern the basic beliefs, needs or FEARS of the audience and play upon those.

Article: PROPAGANDA IN POLITICS
Source: HOME
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