Curated Collections of the Most Useful Facts.

What's This?
North Korean's Rocket

North Korean's Rocket

North Korea (officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea or DPRK) declared in 2009 that it had developed a nuclear weapon, and is widely believed to possess a small stockpile of relatively simple nuclear weapons. The CIA assesses that North Korea also has a substantial arsenal of chemical weapons.

 

Curated by

Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards

Views    371

Share     twitter share  

Curated Facts

On December 12, North Korea successfully launched a rocket to put a working satellite into orbit. According to Pyongyang, the launch is "an important occasion of putting the country's technology for the use of space for peaceful purposes on a new, higher stage". The United States and its Northeast Asian allies, however, see the launch as a cover for a ballistic missile test in violation of United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolutions.

Article: Rocket launch offers an o...
Source: The Nation
Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards 

After reading the some different sources about North Korea's launch, I hope this Knowledge Card helped educated your view.  I admit, I was naive and was afraid from the news about North Korea's rocket launch, but scientifically, the altitude at which the rocket went hopefully proves to other countries that North Korea is moving toward a different path.  Time will only tell,and we would have to wait and see what their next plans are.

Reply

North Korea is also losing business in Myanmar, which has committed to cutting military dealings with Pyongyang as a price for improved relations with the West.

Article: Hair stylist: Lanza silen...
Source: North Korea launched rock...

"North Korea has a track record of conducting nuclear tests following missile launches whose aim was to develop a delivery system for nuclear warheads."

Article: Defiant N Korea celebrate...
Source: Herald Sun
Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards 

The rocket launches that are being develop raises high tension among the United States, South Korea and the United Nation Security Council.  North Korea's leader, Kim Jong-Un, states that the launching satellites into space will help his country's science, technology and the economy. 

Reply

North Korea announced on Dec. 1 that it would launch the rocket, called the Unha-3, sometime between Monday and Dec. 22. But on Sunday it said it might have to postpone the launching[.]

Article: Technical Issues Delay Ro...
Source: The New York Times
Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards 

There was a technical issue in the first-stage control engine module.

Reply

U.S. analysts say the North Koreans' main goal was not to put a satellite into orbit, but just to see all three stages of their rocket work, to show that the rocket could carry its payload a long distance.

Article: What North Korea's Rocket...
Source: Npr
Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards 

The rocket that the North Korean's launched was told to be a similar rocket used by the Iranians. The third stage design, says Theodore Postol, a missle expert at MIT, looks comparable to the designs of the Iranian's rockets. 

Reply

The goal of a space launch vehicle is to insert payloads into orbit and to do so they must perform two functions...Ballistic missiles, on the other hand, have a different goal: to deliver a payload to another spot on the Earth.

Article: WIRED
Source: Wired.com
Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards 

There have been many discrepancy about the issue of North Korean's rocket launch:  Was it really to send a satallite into orbit, or to test an offensive missle to be launched at other countries.  In summary, the altitude is the key information to determine between the motive of the rocket launch.  The higher the altitude, the more likely the launch was to send a satellite into orbit.  The lower the altitude, the more likely the launch was to fire a warhead missle to other countries.  This was an interesting fact that changed my point of view of North Korea's launch.

Reply

[T]he Pyongyang government claimed was a three-stage rocket bid to send an observational satellite into space – was widely condemned for blatantly violating UN Security Council resolutions which ban North Korea from using nuclear and missile technology that could facilitate the firing of long-range rockets.

Article: North Korea's rocket laun...
Source: The Independent
Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards 

The history between North Korea and South Korea have been intense.  There was never a peace treaty between the two country, however, they are in the longest truce in moden history. 

Reply

Article I

The exploration and use of outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and shall be the province of all mankind.

Outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, shall be free for exploration and use by all States without discrimination of any kind, on a basis of equality and in accordance with international law, and there shall be free access to all areas of celestial bodies.

There shall be freedom of scientific investigation in outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, and States shall facilitate and encourage international co-operation in such investigation.

Article: TREATY ON PRINCIPLES GOVE...
Source: OUTER SPACE TREATY

North Korea is banned from testing such technology under United Nations resolutions, and sanctions have been imposed over its previous tests.

Article: Technical Issues Delay Ro...
Source: The New York Times
Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards 

Since 1998, North Korea has attempted launching four rockets into space.  Despite from what North Korea says about their "success" in sending satellites into orbit, Western experts believe all four rockets failed. 

Reply

North Korea’s position is that it is simply exercising its rights to peaceful exploration and use of outer space in accordance with the rights given to all nations under Article I the 1967 Outer Space Treaty, to which it is a Party.

Article: WIRED
Source: Wired.com
Player
feedback