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Educational Psychology

Educational Psychology

Educational psychology is the study of how humans learn in educational settings, the effectiveness of educational interventions, the psychology of teaching, and the social psychology of schools as organizations. Educational psychology is concerned with how students learn and develop.

 

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Short-term memory refers to the part of the memory that has both brief duration and limited capacity. In contrast to long-term memory, which can store an infinite amount of information over a long period of time, the storage of information in short-term memory is restricted and lasts only a few seconds in the absence of rehearsal.

Article:   The control of short-term…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

The United States’ National Academy of Education, for example, has suggested that the knowledge base of teacher education consists of three overarching content domains: (1) knowledge of learners and their development in social contexts; (2) knowledge of subject matter and curriculum goals; and (3) knowledge of teaching and teacher education.

Article:   Preparing teachers for a …
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Teachers are the ones who decide how the written curriculum becomes the enacted curriculum.

Article:   Curriculum assessment
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

Perfectionism refers to a tendency to set unrealistically high standards and goals and to be excessively self-critical. Neurotic perfectionism is linked with eating disorders, alcoholism, and suicidal ideation, and it increases the risk of suicide as an apparent solution to a life of unremitting failure.

Article:   Adolescent suicide attemp…
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Social learning theory identifies learning as the primary factor in a theory of human functioning and personality development that is based on cognitive, social-interactive, self-regulatory, and self-reflective capabilities and processes.

Article:   Social learning theory
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Researchers have argued that teachers' negative perceptions of lower social class students may lead to the development of self-fulfilling prophecies. Lower social class students may internalize the lower expectations of teachers and achieve academically in a manner that is consistent with those teachers' expectations.

Article:   The early education of so…
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A more current term- sexuality education-conveys a broader meaning that includes attitudes, roles and relationships, as well as social and cultural aspects of being female or male. Also, sexuality concepts are learned throughout life from a range of people and resources in a variety of settings.

Article:   The ethics of absinence-o…
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Research has shown that students who base self-worth on academics are likely to posses academic self-validation goals aimed at proving their competence to others.

Article:   Contingencies of self-wor…
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Self-efficacy is a central construct in Albert Bandura's social-cognitive learning theory. It is defined as an expectation that one holds regarding one's capabilities to accomplish a particular task or goal. Self-efficacy is an important part of one's feelings of personal agency and a crucial element of agentic views of motivated learning.

Article:   Self-efficacy: The exerci…
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Students must come to the realization that “one’s epistemological stance defines one’s interpretation and even handling of knowledge.” That is, how one sees and understands the world depends to a great extent on the lens through which one looks at the world.

Article:   What Every Teacher Should…
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