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The LSAT is designed to measure skills that are considered essential for success in law school: the reading and comprehension of complex texts with accuracy and insight; the organization and management of information and the ability to draw reasonable inferences from it; the ability to think critically; and the analysis and evaluation of the reason

 

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Angela Hart

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Since the 1970s the main criticism of the LSAT has come from those who think the test is biased against women and minorities. These critics assert that the information in the test questions, as well as the perspective of the test as a whole, caters to a white male background and viewpoint. A 1995 study by the LSAC showed that women tend to score lower than men on the LSAT and perform slightly below men in their first year of law school. Despite the criticism the LSAT continues to be a primary gatekeeper to law school and the legal profession.

Article: Law School Admission Test
Source: Law School Admission Test...

Law schools use applicants' LSAT scores, along with other criteria, to decide who to admit. Some schools require a minimum LSAT score for acceptance. Others use a formula in which the LSAT score is multiplied and then added to the undergraduate grade point average for a total score that helps them decide which students to admit. Still others use the LSAT score to help them make their decision, but have no hard-and-fast rules regarding a minimum score.

Article: Law School Admission Test
Source: Law School Admission Test...

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The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) was first given in 1948 and started to gain prominence in the late 1960s. By the 1980s, when the number of applications to law schools began to rise, it became a standard part of the law school admission process. The test is administered by the Law School Admission Council (LSAC), which is a nonprofit, nonstock corporation with 193 member law schools in the United States and Canada. All members require the LSAT as part of the admission process.

Article: Law School Admission Test
Source: Law School Admission Test...

What fees are associated with the LSAT?

It costs $160 to take the LSAT and receive one free score report. The late LSAT registration fee is $66. In addition, subscription to the Law School Data Assembly Service (LSDAS) is required for application for most law schools. This subscription costs $121 and includes one free score report. Additional score reports cost $12. Waiver forms for the LSAT and LSDAS fees are available through LSAC and can be downloaded from the LSAC website at www.lsac.org.

Article: Investigating the LSAT
Source: LSAT Information

What specifically does the LSAT test?

The LSAT has 4 main sections – Logical Reasoning (also known as Arguments), Analytical Reasoning (also known as Games), Reading Comprehension, and an essay.

Article: Investigating the LSAT
Source: LSAT Information

Facts you should know about your LSAT score:

Only four of the multiple-choice sections count
The writing section isn’t scored
No points are deducted for blank or wrong answers
Most of the top law schools will average your LSAT scores if you make multiple attempts
Although your LSAT score isn't the only facet considered when applying to law school, it's definitely a big deal! Many law school admissions counselors consider your LSAT score to be the single most important factor for admittance.

Article: What's a Good LSAT Score?
Source: What's a Good LSAT Score?

Your LSAT score can range anywhere from a 120 (low) to a 180 (killer). Even though the average LSAT score is approximately a 150, you'll have to do much better than that to get into one of the top 15 law schools in the country!

Article: What's a Good LSAT Score?
Source: What's a Good LSAT Score?

The LSAT is designed to measure skills that are considered essential for success in law school: the reading and comprehension of complex texts with accuracy and insight; the organization and management of information and the ability to draw reasonable inferences from it; the ability to think critically; and the analysis and evaluation of the reasoning and arguments of others.

Article: The LSAT
Source: Investopedia

The test consists of five 35-minute sections of multiple-choice questions. Four of the five sections contribute to the test taker's score. The unscored section, commonly referred to as the variable section, typically is used to pretest new test questions or to preequate new test forms. The placement of this section will vary. A 35-minute writing sample is administered at the end of the test. LSAC does not score the writing sample, but copies of the writing sample are sent to all law schools to which you apply.

Article: The LSAT
Source: Investopedia

Many law schools require that the LSAT be taken by December for admission the following fall. However, taking the test earlier—in June or September—is often advised.

Article: The LSAT
Source: Investopedia

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is a half-day, standardized test administered four times each year at designated testing centers throughout the world. The test is an integral part of the law school admission process in the United States, Canada, and a growing number of other countries. It provides a standard measure of acquired reading and verbal reasoning skills that law schools can use as one of several factors in assessing applicants.

Article: The LSAT
Source: Investopedia
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