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History of Jeans

History of Jeans

Jeans are pants made from denim. The term "jeans" refers to a particular style of pants called blue jeans and invented by Jacob Davis and Levi Strauss in 1873. Historic brands include Levi's, Lee, and Wrangler. Jeans come in many fits, including skinny, tapered, boot cut and flare. Jeans are now a very popular form of casual dress around the world

 

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Christa Penning

Christa Penning

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1990's: In the worldwide recession of the 1990's, the sale of jeans stopped growing. The Youth market wasn't particularly interested in 501s and other traditional jeans styles, mainly because their parents: the generation born in "blue" were still busy squeezing their aging bodies into them. Since no teenager would be caught dead in anything their parents were wearing, the latest generation of rebellions youth turned to other fabrics and styles. They still wore denim, but it had to be in different finishes, new cuts, shapes, styles, or forms. Jeans were named the "single most potent symbol of American style on planet earth".

Article: The History of Jeans
Source: www.uri.edu

The jeans market grew increasingly fragmented during the 1980s. What had been the uniform of youthful rebellion and social protest during the 1950s and 1960s was now seen as a wardrobe basic and worn by all age groups. The many different styles offered included pinstriped, acid-washed, stonewashed, cigarette cut, twotoned, stretch, and pre-ripped. With this focus on innovation and novelty, many traditional denim manufacturers languished. The designer denim movement continued into the 1990s when well-established fashion houses like Versace, Dolce & Gabbana, and Donna Karan branched out into denim.

Article:   JEANS
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

In the 1960's many, many university and college students wore jeans. Different styles of jeans were made, to match the 60's fashions: embroidered jeans, painted jeans, psychedelic jeans. In many non-western countries, jeans became a symbol of 'Western decadence' and were very hard to get. US companies said that they often received letters from people all around the world asking them to send the writer a pair of jean.

As regulations on world trade became more relaxed in the late 1970's, jeans started to be made more and more in sweatshops in countries in the South. Because the workers were paid very little, jeans became cheaper. More people in the countries of the South started wearing jeans.

Article: The history of jeans
Source: New International

In the 1950's, denim became popular with young people. It was the symbol of the teenage rebel in TV programmes and movies (like James Dean in the 1955 movie Rebel Without a Cause). Some schools in the USA banned students from wearing denim. Teenagers called the waist overalls 'jean pants' - and the name stayed.

Article: The history of jeans
Source: New International

1930's: Hollywood made lots of western movies. cowboys, who often wore jeans in the movies, became very popular. Many Americans who lived in the eastern states went for vacations on "dude ranches" and took pairs of denim "waist overalls" back east with them when they went home.

1940's: Fewer jeans were made during the time of World War II, but "waist overalls" were introduced to the world by American soldiers, who sometimes wore them when they were off duty. After the war, Levi began to see their clothes outside the American West.

Article: The History of Jeans
Source: uri.edu

One of the most recognizable aspects of Levi's jeans was the red label that could be found on the pockets of its famous pants. This was called the "Tab Trademark," and it was introduced to distinguish original Levi's jeans from other brands. Eventually, the decision was made to put a blank red tag on every seventh pair of jeans to protect the company's legal right to the "Tab Trademark." The color of this tag later came to identify the various product lines, including an orange tag to indicate its more quality fabric and styling and the silver tab to indicate its more fashionable line of products.

While the "Tab Trademark" was introduced in 1936, the Levi Strauss company had a recognizable logo many years before. This particular logo was the image of two horses, and it was introduced in 1886.

Article:   Levi Strauss & Co.
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

Shortly after Strauss arrived, he was informed by a local prospector that the miners were having difficulty finding apparel that was sturdy enough to last through a hard day's work. It was at this time that Strauss developed a pair of pants out of canvas, and it wasn't long before the word spread, and the rugged pants were a hit with the miners.Strauss went on to make a few more pairs of the canvas pants before he switched to a durable fabric that the French called serge de Nimes, and which eventually became known as denim. Strauss later colored the fabric with indigo dye and, adopting a suggestion from Nevada tailor Jacob Davis, reinforced the pants with copper rivets. In 1873 Davis and Strauss produced the first pair of Levi's Patent Riveted 501 waist-high overalls (501 was the lot number). Eventually, the copper rivets, found on the pockets and the crotch, were removed.

Article:   Levi Strauss & Co.
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

Popularly speaking, denim has been associated with fabric coloring, garment style, and lifestyle. Whole books have been written about twentieth-century denim and its popularity with teenagers and celebrities. The word has become so popular and generic in its use that rock bands, stage troupes, and even bottled water, have taken the name denim. The name itself is derived from Nimes, a small city in southern France that had long been famous for its textile industry.

Article:   Denim
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

"Blue jeans" are the archetypical garment of the twentieth century. They are traditionally ankle-length, slim-fitting trousers made of blue denim worn for labor and casual dress. The term "jeans," or "blue jeans," has been in widespread usage since the mid-twentieth century. The word "jeans" comes from the word Génes, the French word for Genoa, Italy, where sailors were known to wear sturdy pants of fustian, a sturdy twill of cotton, linen, or wool blend. By the sixteenth century, the fabric was being referred to as "Jene Fustyan." By the eighteenth century, jean fabric was made entirely of cotton and was being used to make work clothes. Jean was available in many colors, but often dyed with indigo. Pants made from jean were often referred to as "jean pants," the origin of the contemporary jeans.

Article:   JEANS
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

Nothing captures the irony of "radical chic" more than designer blue jeans. In the 1960s and early 1970s blue jeans were the universal language of people under twenty-five. Dirty, ragged, and adorned with political slogans, jeans were the quintessential anti-fashion statement of a generation. Fashion moguls nonetheless decided to capitalize on the jeans phenomenon. Designers such as Calvin Klein redesigned and repack-aged jeans into a haute couture item. These designer jeans had little in common with the youth culture jeans except denim. Instead of the peace symbols, globes, and women's liberation signs embroidered by protesters on their jeans, designers adorned their denim with embroidered logos, rhinestones, and silver studs and sold them at three and sometimes four times the cost of ordinary jeans. At Georgio's in Beverly Hills rhinestone-studded jeans sold for $100 and matching jackets for $160.

Article:   AMERICAN DESIGNERS
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

A German immigrant, Levi Strauss (1829-1902), came to New York in 1848 and went to San Francisco in 1850, intent on selling canvas for tents. Finding a need for a sturdy material for men's pants, Strauss made a pair from some of his canvas. From then on, he was in business. Spreading to the eastern United States during the 1930's, today the market for jeans is worldwide.

Article:   THE JEANING OF AMERICA--A…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal
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