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Curb Your Enthusiasm

Curb Your Enthusiasm

Curb Your Enthusiasm is an American comedy television series produced and broadcast by HBO, which premiered on October 15, 2000. As of 2011, it has completed 80 episodes over eight seasons. The series was created by Seinfeld co-creator Larry David, who stars as a fictionalized version of himself.

 

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Albert Troszczynski

Albert Troszczynski

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Curb Your Enthusiasm: Season 8 - An Invitation To The Set (HBO)

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Article: Curb Your Enthusiasm: Sea...
Source: YouTube

Larry David’s onscreen persona serves as a contemporary manifestation of the schlemiel figure from Yiddish folklore and literature. Although David keeps the most essential aspects of the schlemiel intact, he adapts them to twenty-first-century American culture. David’s schlemiel persona attempts to reassert the seemingly assimilated, successful American Jew as a cultural other. In doing so, the series critiques reductive attitudes toward race, religion, and other forms of difference and reflects an uneasiness that many contemporary American Jews feel about their own ethnic identity.

Article:   Curb Your Enthusiasm and …
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

With the best ratings ever already in the tank for Larry David’s Curb Your Enthusism season 8, HBO is hoping for yet another season of the hit show. In an interview with Deadline, HBO president of programming Michael Lombardo joked the network was ‘cautiously optimistic’, stating: “For the first time ever after this season, Larry didn’t say ‘I never want to do this again.”

Article: HBO Hopes for a Curb Your...
Source: HBO Watch

It's deadpan in a way that will certainly appeal to critics if not a mass audience expecting the second coming of ''Seinfeld.'' In some ways ''Curb'' is subtler and more nuanced, but with the same unmistakably Seinfeldian structure of snowballing bad luck.

Article: The Great And Wonderful W...
Source: NY Times

Some comedians say the things that everyone else is thinking; Larry David says the things that nobody realizes they’re allowed to think. Deep down, most people would probably prefer to quietly bow out of the grand tour of a friend’s new home, or not sing the Happy Birthday song. It takes actually seeing someone else blow off such social niceties before a person begins to question the logic of simply going along to get along.

Article: The 'Curb' Effect: How La...
Source: Rolling Stone

Curb Your Enthusiasm: It's Not A Reunion Show But It's The Closest You'll Get (HBO)

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Article: Curb Your Enthusiasm: It'...
Source: YouTube

It was during those struggling stand-up days in New York when Mr. David and Mr. Seinfeld became friends. They'd meet at coffee shops and talk for hours about things like laundry. As Mr. Seinfeld recalled, ''What we had in common was both of us had the ability to focus deeply on something small, to blow small things out of proportion.'' .... The conventional wisdom on why the Seinfeld-David collaboration worked so well is that Jerry made Larry palatable to a mass audience.

Article: The Great And Wonderful W...
Source: NY Times

Mr. David [was] determined to undersell himself, even in the title. HBO wanted to give him a billboard on Sunset Boulevard. No way. ''I don't want to do anything,'' he said. ''I can't stand reading anything that I've said. I hate that kind of attention. I don't want articles and pictures.'' His action plan: ''Let the show sneak up on people.''

Article: The Great And Wonderful W...
Source: NY Times

As for the title, Larry came up with Curb Your Enthusiasm early in the process. "I mean, who likes enthusiasm?" he explained. "It's sickening, isn't it? To see enthusiastic people when you're miserable. Nobody wants that."

Article:   Pretty, Pretty, Pretty Go…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

Regret, remorse -- those are old friends of [Larry David's] comedy. Long ago, he taught himself never to think about the future because it was too painful for him to contemplate. ''To regret the past -- yes!'' he said, his voice rising to a characteristically Costanzan shout. ''To regret everything about the past -- certainly!''

Article: The Great And Wonderful W...
Source: The Great And Wonderful W...

All dialogue is improvised from a loose five-page outline that he has written for each of the 10 episodes of the series. The stand-up scenes and mock-documentary gimmick have been dropped. But it still has the same verite feel.

Article: The Great And Wonderful W...
Source: The Great And Wonderful W...

Curb Your Enthusiasm was nominated for four Emmys® in 2008, including Outstanding Comedy Series. It won the Golden Globe in the Best Television Series - Musical or Comedy category in 2002. In 2003, Robert B. Weide won a directing Emmys® for his work on the series. The series has also received awards from the Writers Guild of America, Directors Guild of America, Banff Television Festival, American Film Institute and Monte Carlo Television Festival, among others.

Article: HBO: Curb Your Enthusiasm...
Source: HBO

Curb Your Enthusiasm is the brainchild of star-creator Larry David who co-created Seinfeld and was the basis for the easily rattled George Costanza (Seinfeld). Like George, David has a tendency to speak too much, blow things out of proportion, and, most often, fail in the end (and often liking it that way). David's new show is also like its predecessor: it's about "nothing" except following the day-to-day ramblings of a sometime writer and comic (this time in L.A.). Eternal questions stemming from universal daily dilemmas are honed to perfect comedic absurdity.

Article: Curb Your Enthusiasm: The...
Source: Amazon.com: Curb Your Ent...
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