Curated Collections of the Most Useful Facts.

What's This?
Doctor Who

Doctor Who

Doctor Who is a British science fiction television programme produced by the British Broadcasting Corporation. The programme depicts the adventures of a Time Lord, a time-travelling, humanoid alien known as the Doctor who explores the universe in a sentient, telepathic time machine called the TARDIS that flies through time and space.

 

Curated by

James Kopf

James Kopf

89 Knowledge Cards

Views    592

Share     twitter share  

Curated Facts

The Daleks [one of the Doctor's oldest and most persistent villains] were created by the Kaled scientist, Davros as travel machines. He had deduced that the years of radiation and chemical poisoning from an ongoing war would lead his race to mutate into immobile organisms. The Dalek travel machines would house these creatures and allow the Kaleds to survive. However, in the course of his experiments, Davros deliberately removed what he considered to be debilitating emotions from the mutants and a force of evil was spawned!

Article: Dalek
Source: BBC

The Doctor usually has a "companion," normally an attractive young woman. The relationship is (typically) not physical, although incidents of Doctor-companion lip-locking have increased... In a break from tradition, the Doctor is currently accompanied by a married couple played by Karen Gillan and Arthur Darvill.

Article: Doctor Who 101
Source: Entertainment Weekly

Decades are like days to the show's titular time traveler--an eccentric humanoid alien who can physically "regenerate" and is centuries old. The Doctor's powers have conveniently allowed him to be played by a succession of actors, including Tom Baker, the beloved David Tennant, and the current Doctor, Matt Smith. "It's a wonderful conceit," says Smith, 28. "There's something interestingly ridiculous about this madman who saves the universe with a cricket bat and a piece of string, or whatever."

Article: Doctor Who 101
Source: Entertainment Weekly

Astronomer Dr Megan Argo was working at Jodrell Bank with an international team that detected a powerful jet of energy from a star exploding in a distant galaxy as a catastrophic supernova. The breakthrough is being officially announced in heavily technical language to the world of science today by the journal Nature. But Megan, 28, a keen fan of British scifi favourite Doctor Who decided to write it up as a fan-fiction adventure to bring home the excitement of the team's finding to ordinary people.

Article: Doctor Who and the Star o...
Source: Scientific American

Using sine-wave oscillators and noise generators, BBC Radiophonic Workshop genius Delia Derbyshire created an astonishing, unworldly slice of electronic music [the Doctor Who Theme] that even today – 47 years after its creation – still sounds like nothing on this planet. When composer Ron Grainer heard the finished product, he asked, bewildered, “Did I really write that?”

Article: Doctor Who's Theme Tunes:...
Source: Telegraph

Doctor Who always strained against its budgetary limitations. It’s often been plagued with cheap sets and unconvincing rubber monsters. Rock quarries were used as inexpensive stand-ins for alien landscapes so often that producers indulged in the meta-joke of having the Doctor land his ship in a real rock quarry at least twice. On the positive side, Who’s writers were able to take advantage of a format that allowed the show to literally go anywhere in the universe and sometimes outside it, with virtually limitless storytelling possibilities.

Article: Doctor Who
Source: The A.V. Club

If a Golden Age can be said to exist for a television series, then surely the BBC-TV serial Doctor Who's golden age occurred with the arrival of producer Philip Hinchcliffe and script editor Robert Holmes in 1975, and ended soon after Hinchcliffe's departure in 1977 and Holmes's in 1978. Doctor Who would run for twelve more seasons, be controlled by two more producers and six more script editors, have three lead actor changes, find itself canceled twice by the BBC, and see the welcome return of many of the Doctor's best enemies.

Article: England Looks to the Futu...
Source: Journal of Popular Cultur...

Over forty years, the Doctor has been played by ten different actors on TV, with others on film, stage, radio and audio media. The TV series was quickly identified with a startling theme tune, composed by Ron Grainer - who also wrote the music for Steptoe and Son, Tales of the Unexpected and Man In A Suitcase (alias TFI Friday) - and a spine-tingling title sequence.

Article: Doctor Who Title Sequence...
Source: TVARK

An icon of modern British culture and the longest-running science-fiction TV show in history, Doctor Who has never been more popular than it is today, thanks to producer Russell T. Davies, whose revitalization of the series returns this month under the aegis of new producer Steven Moffatt.

Article: Doctor Who
Source: The A.V. Club

Doctor Who is the longest-running sci-fi fantasy series in the world. It was created at the BBC in 1963 by Sydney Newman and Donald Wilson, and launched by producer Verity Lambert, who was then 27 years old. Her team, under director Waris Hussein, recorded the first episode An Unearthly Child, by Anthony Coburn, first as a pilot in September 1963 and then again a few weeks later, for the launch transmission on 23rd November.

Article: Doctor Who Title Sequence...
Source: TVARK
Player
feedback