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Quentin Tarantino

Quentin Tarantino

Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, cinematographer and actor. He has received many industry awards, including an Academy Award, a Golden Globe Award, a BAFTA and the Palme d'Or and had been nominated for an Emmy and Grammy.

 

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James Kopf

James Kopf

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It would take a cinephile as nerdy as Tarantino himself to account for the exact details of what's being referenced when and how - and, of course, there are plenty of those. The Quentin Tarantino Archives fansite (tarantino.info) identifies some 80 movies that inspired Kill Bill, from Hitchcock's Marnie ("has the exact same nurse-walking-down-corridor scene") to Japanese retro-horror Goke: Bodysnatcher From Hell ("for the orange sunset sky behind the plane").

Article: Found: Where Tarantino Ge...
Source: The Guardian

Tarantino could be seen to be serving a valuable function: bringing otherwise marginal films back into the mainstream. Since the remake of zombie movie Dawn of the Dead recently topped the US box office, some have argued that "cult" cinema is the mainstream. But how many of us would have known films like those showing at the ICA existed without Quentin? Beyond the name-checking, Tarantino has worked to bring his favourite forgotten movies to light. At his instigation, Hollywood studio Miramax formed the now-defunct Rolling Thunder Pictures to distribute and re-release specialty movies of the type Tarantino would describe as "cool."

Article: Found: Where Tarantino Ge...
Source: The Guardian

Quentin Tarantino has just unveiled the trailer for his latest project, Django Unchained - a western that's already caught our attention thanks to an A-list cast including Jamie Foxx, Leonardo DiCaprio, Christoph Waltz and featuring guest spots from Samuel L Jackson and the RZA. And yet, among all the usual trappings of a Tarantino film - sassy soundtrack, snappy dialogue - we noticed the director's been taking a few fashion tips from elsewhere

Article: 5 Sartorial Influences on...
Source: The List

Although it lacks the catchphrase-generating back-and-forth of certain other celebrity feuds, Quentin Tarantino’s recently filed lawsuit against Alan Ball has its own amusing color: It seems the Academy Award-winning writer-directors are neighbors, and unfortunately for Tarantino, Ball and his partner Peter Macdissi are the proud owners of a large “exotic bird menagerie” which they keep in an outdoor aviary, where “they emit blood-curdling screams at random intervals for 7 to 8 hours each day.” As with any sound appeal for injunction, the papers that Tarantino’s lawyers have filed quote Goethe in their argument, saying, “He is the happiest, be he king or peasant who finds peace in his home.” It then claims that those “obnoxious pterodactyl-like screams” of Ball's Macaws—which the suit helpfully notes are “a large variety of wild parrot known for its intolerably loud screech and for behaving poorly in captivity” —regularly prevent Tarantino from being able to achieve that peace

Article: Quentin Tarantino Suing A...
Source: The A.V. Club

Quentin Tarantino’s self-confessed foot-fetish was satisfied by his muse Uma Thurman, when the actress let the director drink champagne out of her stiletto. The Pulp Fiction duo were at the New York Friars Club Roast at the Hilton Hotel to honour the Kill Bill filmmaker. And 40-year-old Thurman decided there was no better way to celebrate the director, who she’s most famous for working with, than let him drink from her black velvet heels.

Article: Uma Thurman Toasts Quenti...
Source: The Daily Mail

[Jeffrey Ross, the current New York Friars' Club Roastmaster General] joked: ‘Tarantino’s an old Italian word, it means plagiarism.’ Before adding: ‘You changed the face of cinema. I just wish cinema would return the favour.’ Tarantino, 47, thanked the Friars Club for its effort and said: ‘The no comedian thing? It’s kind of interesting, right? It didn’t hurt so bad.’

Article: Uma Thurman Toasts Quenti...
Source: The Daily Mail

Most of the action in Quentin Tarantino’s pulp crime movie [Reservoir Dogs] takes place in a cavernous warehouse, to which the surviving participants of a botched jewelry heist have repaired to lick their wounds. The crooks amuse themselves by accusing each other of treachery (someone tipped off the police), waving their guns, screaming obscenities, and torturing a cop whom one of them has captured. This is, explicitly, a man’s world.

Article: Reservoir Dogs
Source: The New Yorker

Somewhere between the know-it-all decree of the cineratti and the brash, jabbering voice of The People lies Quentin Tarantino’s annual list of the year’s best movies, as according to Quentin Tarantino. And much like years past, Tarantino has refused to kowtow to the conventions of both the industry and list-making, choosing a Top 11 (12 if you count the tie between The Artist and Our Idiot Brother), and picking an eclectic mix of Oscar contenders, upstart indies like Attack The Block, and mainstream multiplex fare such as Paul W.S. Anderson’s widely panned and ignored The Three Musketeers

Article: Quentin Tarantino Certain...
Source: The A.V. Club

Quentin Tarantino’s often hilarious 1997 adaptation of Elmore Leonard’s “Rum Punch” [Jackie Brown] is his most tense and sustained picture, even with its epic length. Set in the sun-kissed Southern California suburbs, it’s a great American movie about men and women testing the limits of their characters in middle age.

Article: Jackie Brown
Source: The New Yorker

Very little in “Basterds” is meant to be taken straight, but the movie isn’t quite farce, either. It’s lodged in an uneasy nowheresville between counterfactual pop fantasia and trashy exploitation. The picture isn’t boring, but it’s ridiculous, and stunningly insensitive—a teen-ager’s dream of revenge too silly to enjoy, even as a joke.

Article: Inglourious Basterds
Source: The New Yorker

It’s difficult to imagine what it’s like to inhabit Tarantino’s mind, crammed as it is with thousands of filmed images…One of the reasons he’s as good a fimmakeras he is is that he’s an audience member first and a director second. Before he began making movies, one of his heroes was Jean-Luc Godard. It says a lot about Tarantino that he prefers Jim McBride’s 1983 remake of “Breathless” to the original.

Article: The Movie Lover
Source: The New Yorker
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