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Amelia Earhart

Amelia Earhart

Amelia Mary Earhart was an American aviation pioneer and author.

 

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Nikita Sidana

Nikita Sidana

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Graduated from Hyde Park High School in Chicago, IL.
Trained as a nurse’s aid
Served as a Voluntary Aid Detachment nurse at a military hospital during World War I.
Enrolled as a pre-med student at Columbia University.
Moved to California to be with her parents. She and her father attended an “aerial meet” in Long Beach and that is where she became interested in flying. The next day, given a helmet and goggles, she boarded the open-cockpit biplane for a 10 minute flight over Los Angeles. She immediately began taking flying instructions from pioneer aviatrix Anita Snook.

Article: Earhart, Amelia
Source: Kids Konnect

Fashion
After a series of record-making flights, she became the first woman to make a solo transatlantic flight in 1932. That same year, Amelia developed flying clothes for the Ninety-Nines. Her first creation was a flying suit with loose trousers, a zipper top and big pockets. Vogue advertised it with a two-page photo spread. Then, she began designing her own line of clothes "for the woman who lives actively."

She dressed according to the occasion whether it was flying or an elegant affair. She was most conscious of the image she projected. Several New York garment manufacturers made an exclusive Amelia Earhart line of clothes which were marketed in 30 cities, with one exclusive store in each city, such as Macy's in New York and Marshall Field's in Chicago.

Article: Biography of Amelia Earha...
Source: Biography of Amelia Earha...

Earhart's name became a household word in 1932 when she became the first woman, and second person, to fly solo across the Atlantic, on the fifth anniversary of Charles Lindbergh's feat, flying a Lockheed Vega from Harbor Grace, Newfoundland to Londonderry, Ireland. That year, she received the Distinguished Flying Cross from the Congress, the Cross of Knight of the Legion of Honor from the French Government, and the Gold Medal of the National Geographic Society from President Hoover.

Article: Amelia Earhart
Source: Amelia Earhart

"The evidence is plentiful -- but not conclusive yet -- to support the hypothesis that Amelia landed and died on the island of Nikumaroro," forensic anthropologist Karen Ramey Burns told Discovery News.

The author of a book on Earhart, Burns believes that the strongest of the amassed evidence comes from the report related to the partial skeleton found by Gallagher.

"The skeleton was found to be consistent in appearance with females of European descent in the United States today, and the stature was consistent with that of Amelia Earhart," said Burns.

Article: Discovery News
Source: News

A new scientific expedition is being mounted in 2012 to investigate the disappearance of Amelia Earhart. It follows prospective fresh evidence from a small, uninhabited Pacific island called Nikumaroro (formerly Gardner island), in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, some 300 miles southeast of her target destination, Howland Island. Some believe Amelia Earhart and her navigator landed, lived as castaways and eventually died there...

Article: What Happened to Amelia E...
Source: Daily News (Colombo, Sri ...

15 May 1923: Earhart became the 16th woman to be issued a pilot's license by the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI)

Article: Amelia Earhart Timeline
Source: Amelia Earhart Timeline

Legendary aviatrix Amelia Earhart most likely died on an uninhabited tropical island in the southwestern Pacific republic of Kiribati, according to researchers at The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR).

Article: Discovery News
Source: News

When 10-year-old Amelia Mary Earhart saw her first plane at a state fair, she was not impressed. "It was a thing of rusty wire and wood and looked not at all interesting," she said. It wasn't until Earhart attended a stunt-flying exhibition, almost a decade later, that she became seriously interested in aviation. A pilot spotted Earhart and her friend, who were watching from an isolated clearing, and dove at them. "I am sure he said to himself, 'Watch me make them scamper,'" she said. Earhart, who felt a mixture of fear and pleasure, stood her ground. As the plane swooped by, something inside her awakened. "I did not understand it at the time," she said, "but I believe that little red airplane said something to me as it swished by." On December 28, 1920, pilot Frank Hawks gave her a ride that would forever change her life. "By the time I had got two or three hundred feet off the ground," she said, "I knew I had to fly."

Article: The Official Website of A...
Source: The Official Website of A...
Nikita Sidana

Nikita Sidana

30 Knowledge Cards 

In 1920  she took her first airplane ride.

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In 1927, Amelia got a phone call that changed her life. Captain Hilton Railey called and made an offer Amelia could not turn down. In 1928, Amelia became the first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean. Even though Amelia was not the pilot, the newspapers pretty much ignored the two men who piloted the plane; Amelia received most of the attention.
Four years later, Amelia flew across the Atlantic on her own in record time -- 13 hours, 30 minutes. By that time, she was famous throughout Europe and the United States. A few years later, she became the first woman to fly from Hawaii to California.
In 1929, Amelia participated in a cross-country air race for women pilots. She also founded an organization of women pilots called the "Ninety-Nines" -- named for its first 99 members.

Article:   Amelia Earhart
Source:  Offline Book/Journal
Nikita Sidana

Nikita Sidana

30 Knowledge Cards 

Amelia was the first female, and one of only a few to date, to receive the Air Force Distinguished Flying Cross.

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George P. Putnam -- Amelia's Husband
George had already published several writings by Charles Lindbergh, and he saw Amelia's flight as a bestselling
story for his publishing house. With pilot Wilmer Stultz and mechanic Lou Gordon, Amelia flew from
Newfoundland to Wales aboard the trimotor plane Friendship . Amelia's
daring and courage were acclaimed around the world. Upon the flight's
completion, Amelia wrote the book 20 Hours - 40 Minutes .

In 1931, Amelia married George, but continued her aviation career under her
maiden name. Amelia and George formed a successful partnership. George
organized Amelia's flights and public appearances, and arranged for her to
endorse a line of flight luggage and sports clothes. George also published two
of her books, The Fun of It , and Last Flight .

Article:   Biography of Amelia Earha…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal
Nikita Sidana

Nikita Sidana

30 Knowledge Cards 

Amelia was initially engaged to be married to a New Englander named Sam Chapman, whom she met while visiting her parents in Los Angeles.

Amelia met her future husband, George Putnam, while Putnam was searching for a female pilot on behalf of Mrs. Frederick Guest of London. Their introduction led to Amelia being chosen the first woman to cross the Atlantic as a passenger.

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Such was her impact on the public that many wrote to her saying they had named babies, lakes and pigeons after her.

Article: The Aviator; the Story ab...
Source: Western Mail (Cardiff, Wa...

Amelia Earhart (July 24, 1897–July 1937) was an aviator and feminist who symbolized the excitement of early aviation and new roles for women to Depression-era Americans. Always a restless and independent spirit, Earhart (photograph overleap) took her first plane ride in 1921 and earned her license soon after. While working at a Boston settlement house in 1928, she jumped at the chance to be a passenger on a flight from Newfoundland to Wales, thus earning the distinction of being the first woman to cross the Atlantic Ocean by plane...

Article: Earhart, Amelia
Source: Encyclopedia of the Great...
Nikita Sidana

Nikita Sidana

30 Knowledge Cards 

Amelia was named Amelia Mary Earhart after her two grandmothers, Amelia Harres Otis and Mary Wells Earhart -- a family tradition.

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The world's most famous woman aviator, the 1st woman to cross the Atlantic in an airplane, was also a tireless and effective advocate of commercial aviation and equal rights for women; became the 1st woman to cross the Atlantic by air (1928), though she was actually a mere passenger while two men acted as pilot and mechanic; toured US lecturing on behalf of her convictions and established numerous records for distance and speed flights; set an altitude record in an auto giro, in which she became the 1st person to cross the US and return (1931); was the 1st woman to fly solo across the Atlantic (1932); made the fastest non-stop transcontinental flight by a woman (1932); broke her own transcontinental speed record (1933); was the 1st person to fly solo across the Pacific from Hawaii to California; was the 1st person to fly solo from Los Angeles to Mexico; broke the Mexico City-Newark, NJ speed record (1935); set a speed record for east-west Pacific crossing from Oakland to Honolulu (1937); became one of the ten most famous women in the world in less than a decade; disappeared in the Pacific Ocean on a round-the-world flight (1937).

Article: Earhart, Amelia (1897–1...
Source: Dictionary of Women World...
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