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Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman was an African-American abolitionist, humanitarian, and Union spy during the American Civil War.

 

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Tommy Sims

Tommy Sims

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Tubman carefully planned each escape and boasted of having never lost a "passenger." These trips remain shrouded in mystery because of Tubman's illiteracy and the secret nature of underground railroad activity.

Article: About Harriet Tubman
Source: About Harriet Tubman
Tommy Sims

Tommy Sims

21 Knowledge Cards 

It is clear that Tubman did not act without scrutinizing each detail of her journey. The idea that she was able to rescue so many people without being caught shows how much of an expert she really was.

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By working as a cook, laundress, and scrubwoman in Philadelphia and Cape May, New Jersey, she financed the first of her famous expeditions into the South—a journey to Baltimore to rescue her sister and two children. She made at least nine trips during the 1850s to lead some 180 slaves to freedom—most were relatives and friends from plantations near Cambridge.

Article: About Harriet Tubman
Source: About Harriet Tubman

From 1862 to 1865 she served as a scout, as well as nurse and laundress, for Union forces in South Carolina. For the Second Carolina Volunteers, under the command of Colonel James Montgomery, Tubman spied on Confederate territory. When she returned with information about the locations of warehouses and ammunition, Montgomery’s troops were able to make carefully planned attacks.

Article: Harriet Tubman
Source: Britannica Online Encyclo...
Tommy Sims

Tommy Sims

21 Knowledge Cards 

Many know of Tubman from the Underground Railroad, but she has also completed other courageous acts. The battle for freedom was never over for Harriet as she used her skills to aid the Union forces.

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She led hundreds to freedom in the North as the most famous "conductor" on the Underground Railroad, an elaborate secret network of safe houses organized for that purpose.

Article: Harriet Tubman biography
Source: Harriet Tubman Biography

By her extraordinary courage, ingenuity, persistence, and iron discipline, which she enforced upon her charges, Tubman became the railroad’s most famous conductor and was known as the “Moses of her people.” It has been said that she never lost a fugitive she was leading to freedom.

Article: Harriet Tubman
Source: Britannica Online Encyclo...

One abolitionist whom she befriended was William Still, himself the son of escaped slaves and a leader in the Philadelphia Vigilance Committee. From Still, Tubman learned of the Underground Railroad and its secret networks of white and black abolitionists who aided escaped slaves as they made their way north.

Article: Tubman, Harriet (1821–1...
Source: Women in World History: A...

Harriet Tubman was an American bondwoman who escaped from slavery in the South to become a leading abolitionist before the American Civil War. She was born in Maryland in 1820, and successfully escaped in 1849.

Article: Harriet Tubman biography
Source: Harriet Tubman Biography

In 1844 she married John Tubman, a free black who lived on a nearby plantation. Her husband's free status, however, did not transfer to Harriet through marriage.

Article: Tubman, Harriet
Source: Encyclopedia of African-A...

At age thirteen, Ross suffered permanent neurological damage after either her overseer or owner struck her in the head with a two-pound lead weight when she placed herself between her master and a fleeing slave. For the rest of her life, she experienced sudden blackouts.

Article: Tubman, Harriet
Source: Encyclopedia of African-A...

Her name spread through slave quarters and abolitionist societies alike. Slaveholders in Maryland also took sharp notice and offered a $40,000 reward for her capture.

Article: Tubman, Harriet (1821–1...
Source: Women in World History: A...
Tommy Sims

Tommy Sims

21 Knowledge Cards 

Harriet was so good at helping slaves escape that they offered an extremely large reward for someone to capture her. Take into account that $40,000 is a much larger amount of money at this point in history. 

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