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Hmong History

Hmong History

History about the Hmong people.

 

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Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards

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Data from the 2010 census released Wednesday night showed the state’s Hmong population rose from 45,443 in 2000 to 66,181 in 2010, an increase of 46 percent. It also showed a significant expansion away the traditional population centers in Hennepin and Ramsey counties.

Article: Latest News
Source: Minnesota


"When I was 13-years-old," explained the General during a taped interview. "I saw how we Hmong would come down from the mountains in our bare feet and get treated like some kind of wild animal by the storekeepers and merchants in the towns. 'Meo, Meo, Meo' they would taunt us, making me feel bad about our position in the world. That day, I made my commitment to love and improve the Hmong people and have given all my heart ever since."

Article: General Vang Pao legacy
Source: Twin Cities Daily Planet
Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards 

"Meo", or also seen as 'Miao," is a derogatory term used to call the Hmong people.  The proper way to address them is, Hmong, as that term ties deep meaning to their culture and identity. 

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His [General Vang Pao] body is riddled with bullet scars suffered from his many years of warfare. Having survived through multiple assassination attempts, airplane crashes and even a carpet bombing, many observers make the claim that this man may have been divinely indestructible.

Article: General Vang Pao legacy
Source: Twin Cities Daily Planet
Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards 

The General Vang Pao is the most iconic hero in recent Hmong history.  He can be viewed similarily as the biblical figure Moses, who led the Hmong out of Laos and to the outside world.

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He [Yang Kaiyi, a Hmong Chinese who visited the Hmong in America several times in the 1990s] writes that he was surprised to learn that many Hmong Americans believe their history can be traced back to Mongolia. Kaiyi‘s article (1996) strongly objects to conjecture that Hmong came from Mongolia. He argues that the ancestral homeland of the Hmong is in central China, and that their history in China can be traced back to about 3,000 BC.

Article:   Commentary: Challeneges a…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal
Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards 

After reading this short commentary paper, it is clear that the Hmong history is complicated.  The fact is, the Hmong were not literate and did not document the events that took place.  As a result, the Hmong generations of today find a hard time putting the history of Hmong together.

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The new roles for women are also causing friction in families. Elders say the shift is upsetting to men who feel they are losing control of their households, and it is creating a rift between many young and older Hmong. Others fear Hmong women are forsaking their cultural identity.

Article: Hmong Women In California...
Source: Huffington Post
Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards 

The battle between men and women in the Hmong traditional roles is challenging to its community.  It is difficult for men to accept the changes in women's role in today's society.

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Mai Der Vang, a 30-year-old poet and a project director for New America Media, an ethnic news organization, writes about the lives her mother and father could not have:

And what you learn on back-to-school night,

when your mother does not know how to

write your name on the chalkboard

of your fourth grade class.

Article: A Hmong Generation Finds ...
Source: The New York Times
Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards 

Back in Laos, education was only for those who could afford it.  Otherwise, many were farmers from the day they were born.  Many Hmong people did not know how to read or write, but were able to express themselves by songs and poetry.

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‘America is more concerned about healing the old wounds between themselves and Vietnam and Laos,’ says Rebecca Sommer. ‘Now it’s all about business, the stock market and having allies in the region to contain the threat of China. The Hmong come way down on the list.’ This has left some Hmong facing an uncertain future in southeast Asia, feeling betrayed and abandoned.

Article: Hmong Timeline
Source: New Internationalist

For over three decades the Lao Hmong (pronounced ‘Mong’) have faced continuous persecution from Lao Government forces as retribution for the support they gave the US during the ‘Secret War’ in the 1960s and 70s. In 1961, the CIA began recruiting Lao Hmong to attack enemy supply lines, rescue downed pilots and protect American military installations as part of the fight to rid the region of communism. After communist forces took control of Laos in 1975 many Hmong were forced to flee to Thailand or move into remote mountain areas where some remain to this day.
‘This is a key part of US history which most Americans know nothing about,’ says Roger Arnold, a photojournalist who spent time with the Hmong in the Lao jungle.

Article: Hmong Timeline
Source: New Internationalist
Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards 

The hidden truth behind the Vietnam War and how under-appreciated the Hmong from their allies.

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At eleven and twelve years old Kao Kalia and her older sister Dawb were expected to attend school during the day and then raise younger siblings in the evenings. Meanwhile, their parents worked second and third shifts at menial jobs ―trying to be American enough to get into the system so that they could feed us and our dreams (p. 157).‖ Yang and her parents were living proof of the sacrifices they believed were required to pave the way for younger children’s future successes.

Article:   The Latehomecomer: A Hmo…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal
Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards 

The sacrifices that early Hmong family generations made in order to adjust to the life in the United States.  With littled education and a language barrier, Hmong parents devoted themselves for the sake of their future generations. 

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...the roots of Hmong migrations from China with the establishment of the Manchu dynasty in 1644, after which time it was supposedly decided to abolish the Hmong autonomy. According to him, the Han Chinese hoped to integrate the Hmong into standard Chinese polity, but when the policy met with Hmong resistance, the Chinese began a 200-year campaign of exterminating those who resisted and replacing Hmong resisters with more pliable Chinese populations.

Article:   The Hmong Come to Souther…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal
Ceev Xiong

Ceev Xiong

42 Knowledge Cards 

A brief history about the Hmong people and their migration.

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