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King Edward II

King Edward II

Edward II (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), also called Edward of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until he was deposed by his wife Isabella in January 1327. He was the sixth Plantagenet king, in a line that began with the reign of Henry II.

 

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Megan Mockler

Megan Mockler

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In 1348 he established the Knights of the Garter which he bestowed on those knights and nobles who had distinguished themselves. Throughout his reign Edward heavily supported and promoted chivalry which in turn allowed him to develop good relationships with the nobility of the kingdom.

Article: Edward III , King of E...
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Edward's first major command was at the battle of Halidon Hill near Berwick 1333 against a Scottish army. Edward defeated the Scots. In addition, the English used a new method of combining forces of longbowmen with dismounted men-at-arms; this strategy was successfully duplicated during the Hundred Years War.

Article: Edward III , King of E...
Source: Edward III , King of E...

Opposition amongst moderate magnates to Lancaster's dominance was led by Aymer de Valence, Earl of Pembroke. These moderates gradually aligned with either Edward II or Thomas of Lancaster. Matters came to a head in 1322. Edward now had enough support to raise an army and march north. Lancaster's allies deserted in droves, and he was captured.
On 22 March 1322, Thomas of Lancaster was beheaded as a traitor by his own castle of Pontefract in Yorkshire.

Article: Edward II
Source: Edward II

Edward's reign was not stable, and he was constantly at odds with the barons of England over the undue influence of his favorites as well as other issues. In 1311 a commission, actually appointed by the King, produced the New-Ordinances, which were an elaborate set of checks and balances to control the power of the Crown. These ordinances included a clause that Piers Gaveston should be exiled. 2 Edward obeyed the Ordinances under duress, but not for long, and in 1312 he recalled Piers to England.

Article: Edward II and Piers Gaves...
Source: Edward II and Piers Gaves...

When his father, King Edward I died in 1307, Edward II took the crown. He vowed to continue the war with Scotland after his father's death, but he was not very successful in this endeavor or any other. He was a very unpopular king for most of his reign. After the crushing defeats of the English at Bannockburn and later Berwick, Edward II was arrested and his son Edward III was put on the throne. Edward II later died in custody and it is generally believed that he as murdered in 1327, on the orders of his wife, Isabella of France.

Article: The Scottish War for Inde...
Source: The Scottish War for Inde...

The young Edward's first exposure to political crisis came in 1297, when a number of barons made common cause against Edward's demands and he was faced with the tough and uncompromising archbishop of Canterbury, Robert Winchelsey, acting in response to the bull "Clericis laicos" of 1296, which sought to forbid clerical taxation for secular purposes without papal consent. Following the stand taken at the Salisbury Parliament by the earls of Hereford and Norfolk, graphically depicted by the chronicler Guisborough, the king made a well stage-managed appeal. On 14 July, flanked by his son and the temporarily reconciled Winchelsey, he is said to have entrusted his heir, the Lord Edward, to the archbishop and to Reginald Grey. And then, Guidborough claims, the magnates performed fealty to Lord Edward, who was acclaimed by those assembled as heir, future lord, and successor to the kingdom.

Article:   King Edward II
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When Edward was only two Eleanor stayed abroad with her husband between mid-May 1286 and 12 August 1289. On the couple's return Edward and four of his five sisters were taken from Langley to Dover to meet their parents. Fifteen months after her disembarkation, on 28 November 1290, the queen died of a lingering fever, possibly malaria, at Harby near Lincoln. The grief-stricken king erected stone crosses along the cortege's route. Eleanor is also remembered by William Torel's fine bronze effigy in Westminster Abbey, while the engraving in William Dugdale's "Book of Monuments" recalls that sculptor's companion figure in Lincoln Cathedral prior to its defacement in the seventeenth century.

Article:   King Edward II
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Edward II was the youngest of fifteen children; he was born on April 25th 1284. At a young age Edward was given his own household. He was raised without much contact between him and his parents, and his mother died when he was six.

Article: The Politics of King Edwa...
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King Edward II was the son of King Edward I and Eleanor of Castile. He was born at Carnarvon in April 1284; succeded his father in July 1307; was forced to resign his crown, and was deposed in January1327. He was murdered at Berkeley Castle, in Gloucestershire, in September 1327.

Article:   Edward the Second
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Edward II (1284–1327), King of England, Lord of Ireland, and Duke of Aquitaine, was the object of ignominy during his lifetime and calumny since it. Conventionally viewed as worthless, incapable of sustained policy, and significant only for his sporadic displays of ill-directed energy or a stubborn adherence to greedy and ambitious favorites, he has been presented as fit only to be deposed and replaced by someone more worthy of the throne.

Article: Edward II
Source: Yale University Press
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