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Labor Day

Labor Day

Labor Day is an American federal holiday observed on the first Monday in September (September 3 in 2012) that celebrates the economic and social contributions of workers.

 

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Megan Mockler

Megan Mockler

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Labor Day is a federal holiday. All Government offices, schools and organizations and many businesses are closed. Some public celebrations, such as fireworks displays, picnics and barbecues, are organized, but they are usually low key events. For many teams, it is the start of the football season. As it is the last chance for many people to take summer trips, there may be some congestion on highways and at airports. Public transit systems do not usually operate on their regular timetables.

Article: Labor Day in United State...
Source: Labor Day in United State...

Observed on the first Monday in September, Labor Day pays tribute to the contributions and achievements of American workers. It was created by the labor movement in the late 19th century and became a federal holiday in 1894. Labor Day also symbolizes the end of summer for many Americans, and is celebrated with parties, parades and athletic events.

Article: Labor Day
Source: History

More than 100 years after the first Labor Day observance, there is still some doubt as to who first proposed the holiday for workers. Some records show that Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, was first in suggesting a day to honor those "who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold." But Peter McGuire's place in Labor Day history has not gone unchallenged. Many believe that Matthew Maguire, a machinist, not Peter McGuire, founded the holiday. Recent research seems to support the contention that Matthew Maguire, later the secretary of Local 344 of the International Association of Machinists in Paterson, N.J., proposed the holiday in 1882 while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York. What is clear is that the Central Labor Union adopted a Labor Day proposal and appointed a committee to plan a demonstration and picnic.

Article: U.S. DOL - The History of...
Source: U.S. DOL

More than a century ago, workers were forced to deal with harsh conditions. They were paid very little, and they often worked 10- to 12-hour days. Men, women and even small children were forced to work even when they were sick. Tired of long hours and dangerous conditions, workers began organizing themselves into labor unions. On top of fighting for higher pay and shorter workdays, they also fought for the rights of children. The workers wanted employers to place limits on the age of their workers so that small children were not overworked or hurt in factories.

Article: News
Source: TIME For Kids

Labor Day quickly became part of the nation's working-class traditions. The following year, the Central Labor Union decided to repeat the affair. In 1884, the national Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions (the precursor to the American Federation of Labor, AFL) called on workers to participate, and by 1886, workers were celebrating Labor Day throughout the country. Workers also pushed to have Labor Day recognized by state and local governments and by their employers. A number of cities passed municipal ordinances recognized the holiday in 1886. Oregon became the first state to enshrine it in 1887, and by 1894, Labor Day was recognized by 24 states, most of which had strong Populist or labor movements.

Article:   Encyclopedia of U.S. Labo…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

In 1884 the Central Labor Union announced that it "will observe the first Monday of September in each year as Labor Day." It also communicated with central labor bodies in other cities to urge them to celebrate the first Monday in September as "a universal holiday for workingmen." Also in 1884, the Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions of the United States and Canada (the predecessor of the American Federation of Labor) unanimously adopted a resolution urging that "the first Monday in September of each year be set aside as laborers' national holiday, and that we recommend its observance by all wage workers, irrespective of sex, calling, or nationality."

Article:   May Day: A Short History …
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

The first Labor Day was held in 1882. Its origins stem from the desire of the Central Labor Union to create a holiday for workers. It became a federal holiday in 1894. It was originally intended that the day would be filled with a street parade to allow the public to appreciate the work of the trade and labor organizations. After the parade, a festival was to be held to amuse local workers and their families. In later years, prominent men and women held speeches. This is less common now, but is sometimes seen in election years. One of the reasons for choosing to celebrate this on the first Monday in September was to add a holiday in the long gap between Independence Day and Thanksgiving.

Article: Labor Day in United State...
Source: Labor Day in United State...

The first observance of Labor Day is believed to have been a parade of 10,000 workers on Sept. 5, 1882, in New York City, organized by Peter J. McGuire, a Carpenters and Joiners Union secretary. By 1893, more than half the states were observing “Labor Day” on one day or another, and Congress passed a bill to establish a federal holiday in 1894. President Grover Cleveland signed the bill soon afterward, designating the first Monday in September as Labor Day.

Article: Newsroom
Source: Newsroom: Facts for Featu...

The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on September 5, 1883. In 1884 the first Monday in September was selected as the holiday, as originally proposed, and the Central Labor Union urged similar organizations in other cities to follow the example of New York and celebrate a "workingmen's holiday" on that date. The idea spread with the growth of labor organizations, and in 1885 Labor Day was celebrated in many industrial centers of the country.

Article: U.S. DOL - The History of...
Source: U.S. DOL

Labor Day is the first Monday of September. This holiday honors the nation's working people, typically with parades. For most Americans it marks the end of the summer vacation season and the start of the school year.

Article: American Holidays | USA.g...
Source: USA.gov
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