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Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King, Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American clergyman, activist, and prominent leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movement.

 

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Thomas Piscina

Thomas Piscina

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“Never, never be afraid to do what's right, especially if the well-being of a person or animal is at stake. Society's punishments are small compared to the wounds we inflict on our soul when we look the other way.”
― Martin Luther King Jr.

“The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.”
― Martin Luther King Jr.

Article: Martin Luther King Jr. ...
Source: Goodreads

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial is conceived of as an engaging landscape experience tied to other landscapes and monuments, not as a single object or memorial dominating the site. The composition of the memorial utilizes landscape elements to powerfully convey four fundamental and recurring themes throughout Dr. King's message: justice, democracy, hope and love. The semicircular geometry of the memorial, juxtaposed within the triangular configuration of the site, engages the Tidal Basin and frames views to the water.

Article: About the Memorial
Source: About the Memorial - Buil...

Martin Luther King Jr. wanted to shut down Washington in the spring of 1968. He was organizing what he hoped would be the longest-running protest in the history of the nation's capital. King called it the Poor People's Campaign. He intended to dramatize the suffering of the nation's poor by bringing them to the capital. Poor people would live together on the National Mall - the long strip of land between the U.S. Capitol and the Lincoln Memorial - and engage in widespread civil disobedience. King wanted to force the federal government to deal with poverty...As historian Gordon Mantler writes, "Whether they went for months, weeks, or just a day or two, many marchers left Washington enlightened, if not transformed." For many Mexican Americans, Mantler says, the Poor People's Campaign provided crucial contacts and skills that they went on to use in their own liberation movement.

Article: POOR PEOPLE'S CAMPAIGN -...
Source: POOR PEOPLE'S CAMPAIGN -...

Dr. Martin Luther King announced his “Northern Crusade” in Chicago in January, 1966...He announced the launching of the Chicago campaign, to be called the Chicago Freedom Movement, a partnership between his Southern Christian Leadership Conference and Chicago’s major civil rights group, the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations. I covered his press conference, and wrote how the campaign would begin by bringing people to an understanding of the “internal colonialism” of the slums, which he compared to the exploitation of some African colonies. He said he would be living part time in a West Side tenement while working to organize black high school students, street gangs and the unemployed.

Article: Dr. Martin Luther King’...
Source: North Avenue Magazine

“Bloody Sunday” was televised around the world. Martin Luther King called for civil rights supporters to come to Selma for a second march. When members of Congress pressured him to restrain the march until a court could rule on whether the protesters deserved federal protection, King found himself torn between their requests for patience and demands of the movement activists pouring into Selma. King, still conflicted, led the second protest on March 9 but turned it around at the same bridge. King’s actions exacerbated the tension between SCLC and the more militant SNCC, who were pushing for more radical tactics that would move from nonviolent protest to win reforms to active opposition to racist institutions.

Article: Bloody Sunday, Selma, Ala...
Source: The Black Past: Remembere...

In April 1963, King made the most crucial decision of his career as a protest leader when he allowed himself to be arrested on Good Friday. King realized there was no certainty that going to jail would revive the Birmingham campaign or that adequate bail funds could be raised while he was in jail. When he deliberated alone in a room at Birmingham's Gaston Motel, he saw himself as "standing at the center of all that my life brought me to be." Unsure of the consequences of his decision, King changed into his work clothes to signla his staff that he would go to jail. "I don't know what will happen or what the outcome will be," he admitted.

Article:   Between Contending Forces…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

Martin Luther King Jr.'s 'I Have a Dream' speech is the most famous portion of the August 28, 1963, March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom...The idea of a 1963 March on Washington was not originally Martin Luther King's; instead it was A. Philip Randolph, a longtime trade union activist and the senior statesman among African-American civil rights leaders, who first suggested such an event early that year.

Article: Martin Luther King Jr.: T...
Source: Martin Luther King Jr.: T...

With the goal of redeeming ‘‘the soul of America’’ through nonviolent resistance, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) was established in 1957, to coordinate the action of local protest groups throughout the South (King, ‘‘Beyond Vietnam,’’ 144). Under the leadership of Martin Luther King, Jr., the organization drew on the power and independence of black churches to support its activities. ‘‘This conference is called,’’ King wrote, with fellow ministers C. K. Steele and Fred Shuttlesworth in January 1957, ‘‘because we have no moral choice, before God, but to delve deeper into the struggle—and to do so with greater reliance on non-violence and with greater unity, coordination, sharing, and Christian understanding’

Article: Southern Christian Leader...
Source: Southern Christian Leader...

He attended Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania and later went on to get his PhD in theology from Boston University. While he was attending school in Boston, Martin Luther King met Coretta Scott. The two married at the home of Coretta's parents and they raised a family of four children.

His active participation in the civil rights movement began with the Montgomery bus boycott inspired by Rosa Parks. He organized the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and used it to lecture on race-related topics

Article: Dr Martin Luther King
Source: Biography of Dr Martin Lu...

Martin Luther King, Jr. was born at noon Tuesday, January 15, 1929, at the family home, 501 Auburn Avenue, N.E., Atlanta, Georgia...Martin Luther King, Jr. began his education at the Yonge Street Elementary School in Atlanta, Georgia. Following Yonge School, he was enrolled in David T. Howard Elementary School. He also attended the Atlanta University Laboratory School and Booker T. Washington High School. Because of his high score on the college entrance examinations in his junior year of high school, he advanced to Morehouse College without formal graduation from Booker T. Washington. Having skipped both the ninth and twelfth grades, Dr. King entered Morehouse at the age of fifteen.

Article: Martin Luther King, Jr.: ...
Source: Martin Luther King, Jr.: ...

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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Speech(I Have A Dream)

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Article: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr...
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