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Napoléon Bonaparte

Napoléon Bonaparte

Napoleon Bonaparte is remembered as one of the greatest military strategist of all time. He created a unique French government and gave rise to the Napoleonic Code which is still relevant today.

 

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Angela Hart

Angela Hart

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Napoleon had 12 siblings, 7 of them survived until adulthood.

Article: 100+ Interesting And Cont...
Source: 100+ Interesting And Cont...

Napoleon’s legal reform, the Napoleonic Code, was influential on many civil laws jurisdictions worldwide.

Article: 100+ Interesting And Cont...
Source: 100+ Interesting And Cont...

Autopsy report concluded that Napoleon died of stomach cancer but some scientists believed he was poisoned with arsenic.

Article: 100+ Interesting And Cont...
Source: 100+ Interesting And Cont...

Napoleon Bonaparte was born on August 15, 1769 in the island of Corsica and died in May 5, 1821 at the age of 51.

Article: 100+ Interesting And Cont...
Source: 100+ Interesting And Cont...

For Napoleon, the return to France meant a return to service with the French military. Upon rejoining his regiment at Nice in June 1793, the young leader quickly showed his support for the Jacobins, a far-left political movement and the most well-known and popular political club from the French Revolution.

It had certainly been a tumultuous few years for France and its citizens. The country was declared a republic in 1792, three years after the Revolution had begun, and the following year King Louis VXI was executed.

Article: Napoleon biography
Source: Napoleon Biography

Considered one of the world's greatest military leaders, Napoleon Bonaparte was born on August 15, 1769, in Ajaccio, Corsica, France. He was the fourth, and second surviving, child of Carlo Buonaparte, a lawyer, and his wife, Letizia Ramolino.

At the time around Napoleon's birth Corsica's occupation by the French had drawn considerable local resistance. Carlo Buonaparte had at first supported the nationalists siding with their leader, Pasquale Paoli. But after Paoli was forced to flee the island, Carlo switched his allegiance to the French. After doing so he was appointed assessor of the judicial district of Ajaccio in 1771, a plush job that eventually enabled him to enroll his two sons, Joseph and Napoleon, in France's College d'Autun.

Article: Napoleon biography
Source: Napoleon Biography

After a failed assassination attempt funded by the British in 1804, Napoleon established a new hereditary monarchy with himself as Emperor Napoleon I. He continued his military triumphs, conquering the Austrian and Russian armies in Ulm and Austerlitz, taking Venice and Dalmatia for the Kingdom of Italy, and placing a number of German states under French control in the Confederation of the Rhine. In 1806 he defeated a Prussian threat to his power in the Battle of Jena-Auerstadt, and in 1807 his victories over the Russians led to the Treaties of Tilsit, which created the Grand Duchy of Warsaw and the Kingdom of Westphalia. When the Portuguese refused to respect Napoleon's blockade of British trade, he became involved in the Peninsular War and took over Iberia.

Article: Napoleon Bonaparte
Source: Napoleon Bonaparte

Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich.
Napoleon Bonaparte
Religion, Rich, Poor
Impossible is a word to be found only in the dictionary of fools.
Napoleon Bonaparte
Impossible, Word, Found
A picture is worth a thousand words.
Napoleon Bonaparte
Art, Words, Worth
Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake.
Napoleon Bonaparte
Enemy, Making, Mistake
Great ambition is the passion of a great character. Those endowed with it may perform very good or very bad acts. All depends on the principles which direct them.
Napoleon Bonaparte

Article: Napoleon Bonaparte Quotes
Source: BrainyQuote

In October 1815, Napoleon was exiled to the remote, British-held island of Saint Helena, in the South Atlantic Ocean. He died there on May 5, 1821, at age 51, most likely from stomach cancer. (During his time in power, Napoleon often posed for paintings with his hand in his vest, leading to some speculation after his death that he had been plagued by stomach pain for years.) Napoleon was buried on the island despite his request to be laid to rest "on the banks of the Seine, among the French people I have loved so much." In 1840, his remains were returned to France and entombed in a crypt at Les Invalides in Paris, where other French military leaders are interred.

Article: The History Channel
Source: History

As a boy, Napoleon attended school in mainland France, where he learned the French language, and went on to graduate from a French military academy in 1785. He then became a second lieutenant in an artillery regiment of the French army. The French Revolution began in 1789, and within three years revolutionaries had overthrown the monarchy and proclaimed a French republic. During the early years of the revolution, Napoleon was largely on leave from the military and home in Corsica, where he became affiliated with the Jacobins, a pro-democracy political group. In 1793, following a clash with the nationalist Corsican governor, Pasquale Paoli (1725-1807), the Bonaparte family fled their native island for mainland France, where Napoleon returned to military duty.

Article: The History Channel
Source: History

Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821), also known as Napoleon I, was a French military leader and emperor who conquered much of Europe in the early 19th century. Born on the island of Corsica, Napoleon rapidly rose through the ranks of the military during the French Revolution (1789-1799). After seizing political power in France in a 1799 coup d’état, he crowned himself emperor in 1804. Shrewd, ambitious and a skilled military strategist, Napoleon successfully waged war against various coalitions of European nations and expanded his empire. However, after a disastrous French invasion of Russia in 1812, Napoleon abdicated the throne two years later and was exiled to the island of Elba. In 1815, he briefly returned to power in his Hundred Days campaign. After a crushing defeat at the Battle of Waterloo, he abdicated once again and was exiled to the remote island of Saint Helena, where he died at 51.

Article: The History Channel
Source: History

In 1800, he defeated the Austrians at Marengo. He then negotiated a general European peace which established French power on the continent. In 1803, Britain resumed war with France, later joined by Russia and Austria. Britain inflicted a naval defeat on the French at Trafalgar (1805) so Napoleon abandoned plans to invade England and turned on the Austro-Russian forces, defeating them at Austerlitz later the same year. He gained much new territory, including annexation of Prussian lands which ostensibly gave him control of Europe. The Holy Roman Empire was dissolved, Holland and Westphalia created, and over the next five years, Napoleon's relatives and loyalists were installed as leaders (in Holland, Westphalia, Italy, Naples, Spain and Sweden).

Article: Napoleon Bonaparte (1769 ...
Source: BBC

France now faced a new coalition - Austria and Russia had allied with Britain. Napoleon returned to Paris where the government was in crisis. In a coup d'etat in November 1799, Napoleon became first consul. In 1802, he was made consul for life and two years later, emperor. He oversaw the centralisation of government, the creation of the Bank of France, the reinstatement of Roman Catholicism as the state religion and law reform with the Code Napoleon.

Article: Napoleon Bonaparte (1769 ...
Source: BBC

Napoleon Bonaparte was born on 15 August 1769 in Corsica into a gentry family. Educated at military school, he was rapidly promoted and in 1796, was made commander of the French army in Italy, where he forced Austria and its allies to make peace. In 1798, Napoleon conquered Ottoman-ruled Egypt in an attempt to strike at British trade routes with India. He was stranded when his fleet was destroyed by the British at the Battle of the Nile.

Article: Napoleon Bonaparte (1769 ...
Source: BBC

While in Paris, Bonaparte induced the Directory to take up the plan of an expedition to Egypt. His object was to make the Mediterranean a French lake, by the conquest of Malta and the Nile Valley, and to menace England in the direction of India. He embarked on 19 May, 1798. The taking of Malta (10 June), of Alexandria (2 July), the battle of the Pyramids (21 July), gave Bonaparte the uncontested mastery of Cairo. At Cairo he affected a great respect for Islam; reproached with this later on, he replied: "It was necessary for General Bonaparte to know the principles of Islamism, the government, the opinions of the four sects, and their relations with Constantinople and Mecca. It was necessary, indeed, for him to be thoroughly acquainted with both religions, for it helped him to win the affection of the clergy in Italy and of the ulemas in Egypt."

Article: Napoleon I (Bonaparte)
Source: CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Na...
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