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The American Revolution

The American Revolution

The American Revolution is also known as the American Revolutionary War and the U.S. War of Independence. The war was faught between the Americans and the British, in response to new taxes and growing discontentment. The French came to assist the American near the end, contributing to an American victory.

 

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Angela Hart

Angela Hart

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The American Revolution influenced Latin America because it was the first modern movement of anticolonialism. Drawing its ideology from the Enlightenment, it manifested a deep faith in the ability of people to advance their rights.

Article: American Revolution, Infl...
Source: Encyclopedia of Latin Ame...
Angela Hart

Angela Hart

41 Knowledge Cards 

The American Revolution was not only important for the development of America, but also in regards to a number of other areas. Latin America was inspired as well as France. The French Revolution was sparked due to a number of occurances, but the success of the American Revolution was a major factor. When the French saw the success America had, they tried to utilize similar methods.

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American women were hot visible contributors to the American revolution, having little place in the public world of politics. But as Auslander demonstrates, this does not mean they were not politicized. In fact, the abundance of patriotic needlework and craft demonstrates a very politicized domesticity. In addition, the boycott of British goods and the adopting of home-spun goods became a way for women to demonstrate their patriotism on their bodies.

Article: Citelighter - The fully a...
Source: Citelighter
Angela Hart

Angela Hart

41 Knowledge Cards 

This revolution was very important because it was faught among all people in America. The rich man and the farmer faught side by side. Women were also very important, they acted as nurses and contributed to the war whenever possible. 

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Michael Pearson has yet another motive for examining the past. A historian, Pearson takes a revolution and looks at it fully from the opposite side, that is, from that of established power. Specifically, in Those Damned Rebels: The American Revolution as Seen through British Eyes, he gives the reader the British view of the American Revolution. He employs actual documents of the time to present a perspective rarely seen on the events of 1776 and by so doing, provides a form of eyewitness account of events deep in the past. He shows that the period, for what was a major revolution in America in terms of the building of a nation, was seen at the time as a relatively minor defeat for the British monarchy.

Article: Citelighter - The fully a...
Source: Citelighter
Angela Hart

Angela Hart

41 Knowledge Cards 

This source is fascinating because it points out an insteresting counter part of the American Revolution. When reading about the war from a British perspective, the events and logic put forth are very different than those that Americans beleive and write about. 

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Revolution has long been a way of changing society by forcing governments to change policy, by resisting the rule of foreign powers, or by wholly overthrowing and replacing governments. And revolts are almost always accompanied by literature. Literature can inspire revolution. The written word can be the spark that starts a revolutionary fire. Literature has always emerged from dissent and thrived on conflict, and both war and revolution have forever been cauldrons for the creation of literature. But literature does not just incite revolutions. It analyzes them, too. One system ends and another begins and someone, historically, feels compelled to examine why it happened and explore what it means.

Article: Citelighter - The fully a...
Source: Citelighter
Angela Hart

Angela Hart

41 Knowledge Cards 

The American Revolution produced a number of literary works. "Common Sense," "The Federalist Papers," and "The Declaration of Independance," are just a few. 

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Adams, John - Second President of the United States
Adams, Samuel - American Revolutionary
Adams, John Quincy - Sixth President of the United States
Adams, Abigail Smith - Wife of John Adams, second president of the United States
Allen, William - Loyalist - former mayor of Philadelphia
Allen, Ethan - American Revolutionary War patriot, hero, and politician.
Arnold, Benedict - American General who defected from the American to the British side
Askin, John - Loyalist fur trader, merchant and official in Upper Canada.
Bowles, William Augustus - Loyalist and Maryland-born English adventurer
Brant, Joseph - Mohawk leader and Loyalist during the American Revolution
Brown, Thomas Burnfoot - British Loyalist during the American Revolution
Cooper, Myles - Loyalist and President of King's College (Columbia University
Dickinson, John - American Statesman and member of the Pennsylvania Assembly
Draper, Mary - Woman who helped soldiers during The American Revolution
Franklin, Benjamin - American Statesman
Franklin, William - Loyalist, Govenor of New Jersey, Son of Ben Franklin
Frederick, George William - King of Great Britain and King of Ireland during the American Revolution
Galloway, Joseph - Loyalist and politician
Girty, Simon - Loyalist and Liaison between Native Americans and Britain  
Greene, Nathanael - American General during the American Revolutionary War
Hancock, John - American Politician, Entrepreneur, and Soldier
Henry, Patrick - Founding father of American Revolutionary War and governor of Virginia
Howe, John - Loyalist printer during the American Revolution
Hutchinson, Thomas - Last British royal governor of colonial Massachusetts
Jay, John - The First Chief Justice of the United States
Jefferson, Thomas - Third US President and Co-Author of the Declaration of Independence
Jones, John Paul - Captain of the American Navy - "I have not yet begun to fight"
Knox, Henry - First United States Secretary of War
Lee, Richard Henry - American Statesman
Lee, Francis Lightfoot - Active in Virginia politics and signer of the Declaration of Independence
Madison, James - Fourth President of the United States
Monroe, James - Fifth President of the United States
Moore, Margaret Catharine - Helped the colonists during the Battle of Cowpens.
Paine, Thomas - Author of "Common Sense" and Revolutionary
Prescott, William - American colonel in the Revolutionary War
Revere, Paul - American Activist and Artisan
Rush, Benjamin - Signatory of the Declaration of Independence
Warren, Joseph - Doctor, Soldier and Statesman of the American Revolution
Washington, George - First President of the United States
Wheatley, Phillis - First published African author in America
Wilson, James - Signer of the Declaration of Independence

Article: The American Revolution -...
Source: The American Revolution
Angela Hart

Angela Hart

41 Knowledge Cards 

It's noteworthy that the people invovled with this revolution were from all different aspects of life, professions, and ranged in ages. There were generals, writers, and diplomots - this war was different than many prior wars due to the lack of religious motivation and royal families. 

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U.S. troops engaged: 217,000
American battle deaths: 4,435
The 13 American colonies fought for independence from British rule to become the United States.
Colonists were frustrated because Britain forced them to pay taxes, yet did not give them any representation in the British Parliament. Colonists rallied behind the phrase, “no taxation without representation.”
The first shots rang out on the morning of April 19, 1775 in Lexington, Mass.

Article: Revolutionary War
Source: Factmonster

King George III was not actually mad (as in crazy), as has often been rumored. At least, he was not exhibiting strange behavior during the Revolutionary War period, when he was a 37-year-old monarch who enjoyed making architectural drawings, collecting paintings by Caravaggio, Poussin, and Raphael, and playing both the violin and piano. It was not until the 1790s that George III began acting bizarrely, and even then it was probably because of the hereditary disease called porphyria (which was an undiagnosed illness until the twentieth century), not because of insanity.171

Article: The American Revolution T...
Source: The American Revolution T...
Angela Hart

Angela Hart

41 Knowledge Cards 

King George III did not understand the war taking place and therefore was unable to raise moral of his troops and provide the nessissary funds. If he had been well, or a strong leader, history would be very different. 

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The Quartering Act of 1774 enabled the governor of Massachusetts to commandeer housing for British officers and soldiers, but it never actually stated that soldiers could commandeer private homes. Instead, it specified "uninhabited houses, out-houses, barns, or other buildings."164 The 1774 Quartering Act was actually a clarification of previous legislation that Parliament had passed in 1765 and renewed and amended annually. Only the original 1765 act included taverns, alehouses, and inns among the locations that officials could commandeer for the regulars. Even then, provinces were to pay innkeepers and tavern owners for the use of their property.165 Tales of officers knocking on doors to demand lodging for British troops appear to be legends without any substantive basis in contemporary evidence.166

Article: The American Revolution T...
Source: The American Revolution T...
Angela Hart

Angela Hart

41 Knowledge Cards 

It's important to look into facts regarding historical events because some of them are legends, such as this one. 

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The American Revolution (1775-83) is also known as the American Revolutionary War and the U.S. War of Independence. The conflict arose from growing tensions between residents of Great Britain's 13 North American colonies and the colonial government, which represented the British crown. Skirmishes between British troops and colonial militiamen in Lexington and Concord in April 1775 kicked off the armed conflict, and by the following summer, the rebels were waging a full-scale war for their independence. France entered the American Revolution on the side of the colonists in 1778, turning what had essentially been a civil war into an international conflict. After French assistance helped the Continental Army force the British surrender at Yorktown, Virginia, in 1779, the Americans had effectively won their independence, though fighting would not formally end until 1783.

Article: The History Channel
Source: History
Angela Hart

Angela Hart

41 Knowledge Cards 

This source does an excellent job of summarizing the event. When first conducting research, it's important to develop a basis knowledge of what you are looking into. 

One negative aspect would be that in order to develop an in-depth understanding, one needs to understand the events that lead up to the American Revolution. (Historical understanding is important for a topic of this nature) Viewing an event in history requires researching who was involved prior to the occurance of the event being examined. (Taking an event out of context, fails to relay the full impact it had.) 

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