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Catching Fire

Catching Fire

Catching Fire is the second book in The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins. As the sequel to the 2008 bestseller The Hunger Games, it continues the story of Katniss Everdeen and the fictional, futuristic nation of Panem.

 

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In addition to the continuing story of the girl in the ring, “Catching Fire” is a portrait of how a desperate government tries to hold off a revolutionary tide and as such has something of the epic feeling of Orwell to it. (But for kids.)

Article: Sunday Book Review
Source: The New York Times

It certainly helps that at the heart of this exotic world is a very real girl, the kind lacking even a single supernatural gift. (Those “real” types seem to be in short supply in children’s books lately.) Katniss is good with a bow and arrow, not because she was born that way or struck by lightning, but because she was poor and hunted to survive (i.e., practice).

Article: Sunday Book Review
Source: The New York Times

Incidentally, just because this book is intended for a young audience doesn’t mean that Collins isn’t delightfully ruthless. This is a world in which bad things happen to good characters. Right before her return to the arena, Katniss is made to watch as a beloved adult character is beaten and dragged away. At that moment, Panem feels like a place where anything might happen, and where a reader will want to return to see what happens next.

Article: Sunday Book Review
Source: The New York Times

The movies are based on Suzanne Collins' bestselling trio of young adult novels. Lionsgate has rights to turn the three books into four movies.

The books are giant sellers -- "Hunger Games" has sold more than 3 million copies in the United States alone -- and the movies have generated enormous enthusiasm.

Article: 'Hunger Games' Sequel Set...
Source: The Wrap Movies

right when it seems as if the plot might be going into a holding pattern between the first and third acts of the trilogy, a blindsiding development hurtles the story along and matches, if not exceeds, the unfiltered adrenaline rush of the first book.

Article: Catching Fire
Source: Booklist Online

Again, Collins’ crystalline, unadorned prose provides an open window to perfect pacing and electrifying world building, but what’s even more remarkable is that aside from being tremendously action-packed science-fiction thrillers, these books are also brimming with potent themes of morality, obedience, sacrifice, redemption, love, law, and, above all, survival.

Article: Catching Fire
Source: Booklist Online

One of the themes in Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins is interdependence vs. independence. Interdependence means when two people are mutually depending on each other. Independence is when someone is acting alone, free of control. In The Hunger Games book 2, Katniss and Peeta are definitely interdependent. They are both helping each other to survive. As a matter of fact, they want the other one to survive more than they do themselves. They are actually putting themselves in more danger because they are trying to help each other win in the arena.

Article: Catching Fire by Suzanne ...
Source: Bright Hub Education

Government control is another huge Catching Fire theme. Both books in The Hunger Games series focus on this theme since the Hunger Games are a direct result of government control. In the first book, the government rears its ugly head several times by making young children and teens fight to their death as a reminder of the Capital's ultimate control. In book two, the government exerts even more control over the main characters:

President Snow personally threatens Katniss in her home.
The 75th annual Hunger Games have "new" rules that cause Katniss and Peeta to be in danger once again.
More "Peacekeepers" are placed in districts to squash any hope that the citizens started to have after the last Hunger Games.
Examples of the government's brutality are shown throughout Catching Fire.

Article: Catching Fire by Suzanne ...
Source: Bright Hub Education

Catching Fire also focuses on rebellion. Katniss has had her own forms of rebellion throughout The Hunger Games series. When she threatens to commit suicide with Peeta at the end of book one in the arena, that was a form of rebellion. When she continues to hunt even though she has enough food in book 2, she is rebelling against the Capital's laws.

Also in Catching Fire, Katniss wonders if the districts could hold more uprisings like they did in the past.

Article: Catching Fire by Suzanne ...
Source: Bright Hub Education

The book opens with Katniss and Peeta reluctantly embarking on their victory tour through the 12 oppressed districts of Panem, where they witness more than a few surprising things.

Article: Catching Fire
Source: Booklist Online

Against all odds, Katniss Everdeen has won the annual Hunger Games with fellow district tribute Peeta Mellark. But it was a victory won by defiance of the Capitol and their harsh rules. Katniss and Peeta should be happy. After all, they have just won for themselves and their families a life of safety and plenty. But there are rumors of rebellion among the subjects, and Katniss and Peeta, to their horror, are the faces of that rebellion. The Capitol is angry. The Capitol wants revenge!

Article: Catching Fire
Source: The Scholastic Store
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