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Prepositions in Standard English

Prepositions in Standard English

Prepositions are a grammatically distinct class of words whose central members express spatial relations or serve to mark syntactic functions and semantic roles. A preposition typically combines with another constituent (called its complement) to form a prepositional phrase, relating the complement to the context in which the phrase occurs.

 

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Christa Penning

Christa Penning

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Sometimes the same word can be either a preposition or an adverb, or either a preposition or a conjunction.

Article: 1.5a - Preposition & ...
Source: University of Calgary

A word that looks like a preposition but is actually part of a verb is called a particle. "Held up" is a verb meaning “to rob.” Therefore, "up" is not a preposition, and bank is not the object of a preposition. Instead, bank is the direct object of the verb held up. To avoid confusing prepositions with particles, test by moving the word (up) and words following it to the front of the sentence: "Up the bank four armed men held."

Article: Prepositions
Source: Towson University

Some prepositions are composed of more than one word and are called compound prepositions. EXAMPLES: according to, because of, in front of, instead of, in spite of, and next to.

Article: 4. Compound Prepositions
Source: myenglishgrammar.com

Prepositions of Movement: to and No Preposition. We use "to" in order to express movement toward a place. "Toward" and "towards" are also helpful prepositions to express movement. These are simply variant spellings of the same word; use whichever sounds better to you. With the words "home," "downtown," "uptown," "inside," "outside," "downstairs," and "upstairs," we use no preposition.
Prepositions of Time: for and since. We use "for" when we measure time (seconds, minutes, hours, days, months, years). We use "since" with a specific date or time.

Article: Prepositions: Locators in...
Source: Capital Community College...

To express notions of an object being higher than a point, English uses the following prepositions: over, above.
To express notions of an object being lower than a point, English uses the following prepositions: under, underneath, beneath, below.
To express notions of an object being close to a point, English uses the following prepositions: near, by, next to, between, among, opposite.

Article: Prepositions for Time, Pl...
Source: Prepositions

Prepositions of Time: at, on, and in. We use "at" to designate specific times. We use "on" to designate days and dates. We use "in" for nonspecific times during a day, a month, a season, or a year.
Prepositions of Place: at, on, and in. We use "at" for specific addresses. We use "on" to designate names of streets, avenues, etc. And we use "in" for the names of land-areas (towns, counties, states, countries, and continents).

Article: Prepositions: Locators in...
Source: Capital Community College...

To express notions of place, English uses the following prepositions: to talk about the point itself: in, to express something contained: inside, to talk about the surface: on, to talk about a general vicinity, at.

Article: Prepositions for Time, Pl...
Source: Prepositions

A prepositional phrase is a group of words containing a preposition, a noun or pronoun object of the preposition, and any modifiers of the object. A preposition sits in front of (is “pre-positioned” before) its object.

Article: Prepositions
Source: Towson University

The name "preposition" (pre + position) means "place before". Prepositions usually come before another word, usually a noun or noun phrase: noun, pronoun, noun phrase, gerund (verb in -ing form)

Article: Prepositions
Source: Englishclub.com

There are more than 100 prepositions in English. Yet this is a very small number when you think of the thousands of other words (nouns, verbs etc). Prepositions are important words. We use individual prepositions more frequently than other individual words. In fact, the prepositions of, to and in are among the ten most frequent words in English.

Article: Prepositions
Source: Englishclub.com

The name "preposition" (pre + position) means "place before". Prepositions usually come before another word, usually a noun or noun phrase: noun, pronoun, noun phrase, gerund (verb in -ing form)

Article: Prepositions
Source: Prepositions
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