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Kenneth Grahame

Kenneth Grahame

Kenneth Grahame (8 March 1859 – 6 July 1932) was a Scottish writer, most famous for The Wind in the Willows (1908), one of the classics of children's literature. He also wrote The Reluctant Dragon; both books were later adapted into Disney films.

 

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Kenneth Grahame bequeathed all the royalties in his works to ‘the University of Oxford for the benefit of the Bodleian Library’, an act of generosity that has enabled the Library to purchase many important books and manuscripts over the years

Article: Kenneth Grahame
Source: Bodleian Library

He longed to attend the University of Oxford but, to his lifelong regret, his desires were frustrated by his uncle, who refused to pay for him. Grahame pursued instead a successful career in the world of finance, rising to become Secretary of the Bank of England

Article: Kenneth Grahame
Source: Bodleian Library

Grahame’s first book was about paganism, a belief quite fashionable with certain writers at the end of the nineteenth century.

Article: Kenneth Grahame - Penguin...
Source: Penguin Books Authors

His other love was children and writing success came in the 1890s with books about children. He wrote for children because he saw them as ‘the only really living people

Article: Kenneth Grahame - Penguin...
Source: Penguin Books Authors

Begun as a series of stories told by Kenneth Grahame to his six-year-old son, The Wind in the Willows has become one of the most beloved works of children’s literature ever written

Article: The Wind in the Willows -...
Source: Harvard University Press

During his early years in London, and even before beginning to work with the Bank of England, Kenneth became acquainted with some leading literary figures and began to socialise in literary circles. His own writings were kept fairly secret at first, with a few essays being published under a penname in St Edward's Chronicle, the school magazine of his former school.

Article: Kenneth Grahame Society
Source: Kenneth Grahame Society

[The Wind in the Willows] The book itself abounds in scenes of domestic coziness, charmed circles in their own right wherein we meet a mole, a water rat, a badger, each dwelling in comfortable womb-like burrows that exude that particularly British domestic security for which Grahame's book is often mist remembered

Article:   Pottering About in the Ga…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

Among late-Victorian and Edwardian novels of fantasy, the one which seems to have retained the greatest power to affect readers emotionally, from childhood into adulthood, is Kenneth Grahame's The Wind in the Willows. It is considered a "household book" because the feelings it arouses are so special and private

Article:   At the Back of "The Wind …
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

Loss, deprivation of place, and the desire to escape from the city seem to dominate Grahame's life.

Article:   At the Back of "The Wind …
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

Grahame retired from his work in 1908, officially because of health reasons, but perhaps also under pressure from his employees. His son Alastair, who appears to have been psychologically disturbed, committed suicide while an undergraduate at Oxford, by laying on train tracks at Oxford, two days before his 20th birthday. Grahame stopped writing after WW I.

Article: Kenneth Grahame
Source: www.kirjasto.sci.fi
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