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Military Privatization

Military Privatization

A Private Military Company (PMC) or (private military or security companies) provides military and security services. These combatants are commonly known as mercenaries, though modern-day PMCs refer to their staff as security contractors, private military contractors or private security contractors.

 

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James Kopf

James Kopf

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International treaties established to control the use of mercenaries include the Additional Protocol I and II to Article 47 of the Geneva Convention (1949), the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) Convention for the Elimination of Mercenaries in Africa (1972), and the International Convention against the Recruitment, Use, Financing and Training of Mercenaries (1989). These treaties regulate, for the most part, the relationship between states concerned with the use of international private violence, understood as mercenarism.

Article: International Law and the...
Source: Cultures & Conflits

Prior to 1945, concerns to do with mercenaries were expressed largely through the development of the law of neutrality. A country that allowed its national territory to be used for the purpose of the recruitment or enlistment of mercenaries was deemed to be in support of a belligerent. This was a position that was likely to draw th

Article: International Law and the...
Source: Cultures & Conflits

It's a natural progression from a military life. The private security sector led me into bodyguard work, Kevin Costner sort of "suits in boots." Then Iraq and Afghanistan crept up, and now it's armed security details in hostile environments.

Article: Brainstorm
Source: Psychology Today

["]It's a natural progression from a military life. The private security sector led me into bodyguard work, Kevin Costner sort of "suits in boots." Then Iraq and Afghanistan crept up, and now it's armed security details in hostile environments[," said John Geddes, founder of Ronin Concepts, a private military training facility.]

Article: Ask the Mercenary
Source: Psychology Today

International acceptance of private militaries waned with the rise of the nation-state in the sixteenth century, when citizens became more closely associated with their national governments.' As nations formed, new states attempted to monopolize violence and began to reign in private violence.

Article: Private Military Firms in...
Source: Fordham Law Review

Mercenary activity is unsettling to a world organized by nationstates, as the image of a soldier of fortune loyal to no state disrupts the current state-oriented hegemony. Mercenaries operate now, however, as they have for thousands of years throughout the history of warfare." Soldiers have fought for states not their own in many of the twentieth century's conflicts, large and small.

Article: Private Military Firms in...
Source: Fordham Law Review

The military makes war and conducts peacekeeping operations in our name. But when private contractors open fire, in whose name are they shooting? The Defense Department and congressional committees will need to sort out such questions. Private military contractors are not going away. To the contrary, they represent an important aspect of the future of war.

Article: Outsourcing Conflict
Source: The Atlantic

The quasi-privatization of war has a long history and is consistent with America’s efficient capitalistic economy. The idea of a large American military presence anywhere without contractors is now unthinkable. Without firms like KBR, the support tail in Iraq would be infinitely longer than it is, with tens of thousands of more troops required to achieve the same result.

Article: Outsourcing Conflict
Source: The Atlantic

The CIA hired Blackwater in 2004 for a multimillion-dollar plan to locate and kill members of al-Qaeda... According to the New York Times, Blackwater helped with training, planning and surveillance. It is unclear whether the CIA intended to use Blackwater to carry out the assassinations—no suspected terrorists were killed under the auspices of the programme. But the scheme adds to doubts over the role of private-security firms in the war and efforts to hold contractors accountable.

Article: Blackwater's Dark Heart
Source: The Economist

The failure of various navies to restrict the flourishing business of Somali buccaneers is forcing the maritime community to try a new approach. Mercenaries—or as they prefer to be called, “private security organisations”—may finally play a helping role.

Article: A Mercenary Solution to S...
Source: The Economist
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