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Romney - Defense Spending

Romney - Defense Spending

Mitt Romney supports increasing defense spending.

 

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Olivia Conetta

Olivia Conetta

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“When I add up the demands of all these defense missions,” he concluded, “I do not come up with budget cuts.” Romney’s bottom line assessment of our defense needs three years and several rounds of budget cuts ago was that “we cannot fulfill our military missions without an increase of $50 billion per year in the modernization budget.”

Article: Gov. Romney on Defense Sp...
Source: Gov. Romney on Defense Sp...

"We have two courses we can follow: One is to follow in the pathway of Europe, to shrink our military smaller and smaller to pay for our social needs," Romney told a San Diego crowd of some 5,000 on Monday outside the Veterans Memorial Center and Museum. "The other is to commit to preserve America as the strongest military in the world, second to none, with no comparable power anywhere in the world."

Article: Mitt Romney Wants the Big...
Source: Mitt Romney Wants the Big...

However, as I said at the Citadel, I will reverse President Obama’s massive defense cuts. Any savings we will find in the defense budget we will re-direct to rebuild our navy and our air force, to add active duty soldiers and sailors, and to provide the care our veterans deserve. The world has not become a less dangerous place. We must preserve our commitment to a military that is so strong, no nation would ever think of testing it.

Article: Transcript: Mitt Romney D...
Source: Transcript: Mitt Romney D...

Romney hasn’t released many details about his budget, but he’s laid out a few core principles. He would decrease and cap all federal spending at 20 percent of GDP, down from its current level of 24 percent of GDP. Within that, core defense spending would have a floor of 4 percent of GDP, leaving 16 percent for everything else.
According to those principles, Romney would increase defense spending to $7.9 trillion between 2013 and 2022, says the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Article: Compared to Ryan, Romney ...
Source: Compared to Ryan, Romney ...

Mitt Romney says Congress and the president should delay looming cuts in military and domestic spending for at least one year.

The Republican presidential contender said Friday during a campaign trip to Las Vegas that the cuts would be "terrible," particularly for the military.

Congress approved the cuts as part of a deal to reduce the deficit. They were designed to help lawmakers come up with a better plan. But that didn't happen - so the cuts are scheduled to go into effect next year.

Romney says he wants President Barack Obama and lawmakers to work together to put, in his words, "a year's runway," in place to give the next president time to reform the tax system and ensure the military's needs are met.

Article: Romney calls for delay on...
Source: Romney calls for delay on...

“I am fully committed to strengthening America through our values, through a growing economy, and through a military that’s second to none,” Romney said. “I will not cut the military budget. I will instead expand our essential weapons programs and our (number of) active-duty personnel. I do these things not so that we have to fight wars, but so that we can prevent wars.”

Article: Romney to Legion: I will ...
Source: Romney to Legion: I will ...

Would increase strength of armed forces, including number of troops and warships, adding almost $100 billion to the Pentagon budget in 2016.

Article: Obama and Romney: Where t...
Source: Obama and Romney: Where t...

Take the Navy, which plans to build nine ships a year for the next three decades at a cost of at least $20 billion a year, or $599 billion through 2042.
Romney says he wants to increase that to 15 per year, which, according to Congressional Budget Office estimates, would increase the annual budget to $33.5 billion a year, nearly doubling costs over the next 30 years to $1.005 trillion.

Article: Obama, Romney Spar Over D...
Source: Obama, Romney Spar Over D...

Based on the White House Office of Management and Budget's GDP projections, a Romney administration would fork out roughly $800 billion toward national defense in 2016 -- a notably higher amount than the trimmed-down $578 billion proposed by the Obama administration.

Article: Obama, Romney Spar Over D...
Source: Obama, Romney Spar Over D...

With proper management, we can do far better in controlling costs and getting more for our taxpayer dollars. The measures Mitt Romney will take include establishing clear lines of authority and accountability for each weapons system so they remain on time and on budget. He will institute shorter design and delivery cycles for weapons systems to eliminate the current practice of relying on yet-to-be-developed technologies, which creates delays and cost overruns. This will foster more realistic planning, get equipment into the field at a faster pace, and save the cost of having to keep older weapons systems in circulation. He will institute greater competition at all levels of the procurement process. And he will work with Congress to pass budgets on time — something the Obama administration has habitually failed to do — to allow the Department of Defense and defense contractors to properly plan multi-year projects without delay and disruption. These and other reforms will ensure a functioning procurement system that redirects savings into the defense of our nation.

Article: National Defense
Source: National Defense

This will not be a cost-free process. We cannot rebuild our military strength without paying for it. Mitt will begin by reversing Obama-era defense cuts and return to the budget baseline established by Secretary Robert Gates in 2010, with the goal of setting core defense spending — meaning funds devoted to the fundamental military components of personnel, operations and maintenance, procurement, and research and development — at a floor of 4 percent of GDP.

Article: National Defense
Source: National Defense
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