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Kansas

Kansas

Kansas is a U.S. state located in the Midwestern United States. It is named after the Kansas River which flows through it, which in turn was named after the Kansa Native American tribe, which inhabited the area. The tribe's name is often said to mean "people of the wind" or "people of the south wind."

 

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Kabir Malkani

Kabir Malkani

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Curated Facts

There’s another kind of threat at work in Kansas and Virginia. TRAP, or “targeted regulation of abortion provider” laws, are burdensome restrictions that are designed to put abortion clinics out of business.

Article: SALON
Source: Salon.com

Kansas' official flag was adopted in 1927. The flag has a blue field, the word "KANSAS," the sunflower (Kansas' state flower), and the state seal of Kansas. The seal pictures rich Kansas farmland, a farmer plowing, covered wagons, Native Americans hunting bison, a rising sun, a steamboat (representing commerce) on the water (beneath the sun and the mountains), 34 stars (since Kansas was the 34th state in the USA), and the state motto, "AD ASTRA PER ASPERA," meaning "To the stars through difficulty," in Latin.

Article: Kansas: Facts, Map and St...
Source: EnchantedLearning.com

Kansas has long been known as part of America's agricultural heartland, and is home to the major U.S. military installation Fort Leavenworth. In 1954, it became a battleground of the civil rights movement when the landmark Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka case was decided in the Supreme Court, ending the doctrine of "separate but equal" in public schools.

Article: Kansas
Source: History

But Kansas was next to the slave state of Missouri. In an era that would come to be known as "Bleeding Kansas," the territory would become a battleground over the slavery question.

The reaction from the North was immediate. Eli Thayer organized the New England Emigrant Aid Company, which sent settlers to Kansas to secure it as a free territory. By the summer of 1855, approximately 1,200 New Englanders had made the journey to the new territory, armed to fight for freedom.

Article: Bleeding Kansas
Source: Bleeding Kansas

The Geographical Center of the United States (contiguous 48) is located about two miles northwest of Lebanon, Kansas. Take US Highway 281 north 1 mile, and turn west one mile on K-191 to the maker that has been erected at the end of the paved road.

Article: Geographical Center of th...
Source: Geographical Center of th...

Dodge City is the windiest city in the United States, with an average wind speed of 14 miles per hour.

Article: Kansas Fun Facts and Triv...
Source: Kansas Fun Facts and Triv...

Religion in Kansas: 81.3% Christian (61.3% Protestant, 20% Catholic), 17.5% No Religion, 0.8% LDS, 0.4% Other Religions

Article: Kansas - Fun Facts, State...
Source: Kansas - Fun Facts, State...

Origin of the name - From the Kansas River which was named by the French after the Dakota Sioux Indian word "Kanze" meaning "south wind."

Article: History of Kansas
Source: Facts about the History o...

Kansas was a crucial battleground in the fight over slavery between 1858-1859, and was finally admitted as a free state in 1861, just before the Civil War.

Article: Facts about Kansas
Source: Facts about Kansas

“Bleeding Kansas” was a term used by Horace Greeley of the New York Tribune to describe the violent hostilities between pro and antislavery forces in the Kansas territory during the mid and late 1850s.

Article: Bleeding Kansas
Source: Bleeding Kansas

The Native Indians of Kansas were the Apache, Arapaho, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chippewa, Comanche, Delaware, Fox, Illinois and Iroquois

Article: History of Kansas
Source: Facts about the History o...

The first woman mayor in the United States was Susan Madora Salter. She was elected to office in Argonia in 1887.

Article: Kansas Facts and Trivia
Source: Kansas Fast Facts and Tri...

Spanish explorer Francisco de Coronado, in 1541, is considered the first European to have traveled this region. Sieur de la Salle's extensive land claims for France (1682) included present-day Kansas. Ceded to Spain by France in 1763, the territory reverted to France in 1800 and was sold to the U.S. as part of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803.

Article: Kansas
Source: Infoplease

By the time the strife waned in 1859, nearly 60 people had died and hundreds terrorized throughout Kansas Territory in the struggle over slavery. Anti-slavery forces finally prevailed.

Article: Fort Scott
Source: History & Culture - Fort ...

Kansas was the first state to ratify the 15th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which gave African-American men the right to vote.

Article: Kansas - Fun Facts, State...
Source: Kansas - Fun Facts, State...
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