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Epilepsy

Epilepsy

Epilepsy (from Ancient Greek ἐπιληψία), is a common and diverse set of chronic neurological disorders characterized by seizures.

 

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Epilepsy results in an estimated annual cost of $15.5 billion in medical costs

Article: Epilepsy
Source: CDC

About 10% of people will experience a seizure sometime during their lifetime and about 3% will have had a diagnosis of epilepsy by age 80.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: CDC

Epilepsy affects about 2.0 million Americans.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: CDC

Other ways to treat epilepsy include vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), ketogenic diet (now only recommended for children with difficult to treat epilepsy) and surgery.

Article: Treating Epilepsy
Source: NetDoctor.co.uk

Epilepsy is usually treated with medicines

Article: Treating Epilepsy
Source: NetDoctor.co.uk

Head CT or MRI scan often done to find the cause and location of the problem in the brain.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: The New York Times Compan...

An EEG (electroencephalogram) will be done to check the electrical activity in the brain. People with epilepsy will often have abnormal electrical activity seen on this test.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: The New York Times Compan...

The doctor will perform a physical exam, which will include a detailed look at the brain and nervous system.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: The New York Times Compan...

Tonic-clonic seizures (also called grand mal). The most intense of all types of seizures, these are characterized by a loss of consciousness, body stiffening and shaking, and sometimes loss of bladder control or biting your tongue.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: Mayo Foundation For Medic...

Atonic seizures. Also known as drop attacks, these seizures cause you to lose normal muscle tone and suddenly collapse or fall down.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: Mayo Foundation For Medic...

Myoclonic seizures. These seizures usually appear as sudden brief jerks or twitches of your arms and legs.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: Mayo Foundation For Medic...

Clonic seizures. These types of seizures are associated with rhythmic, jerking muscle contractions, usually affecting the arms, neck and face.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: Mayo Foundation For Medic...

Tonic seizures. These seizures cause stiffening of the muscles, generally those in your back, arms and legs and may cause you to fall to the ground.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: Mayo Foundation For Medic...

Absence seizures (also called petit mal). These seizures are characterized by staring and subtle body movement, and can cause a brief loss of awareness.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: Mayo Foundation For Medic...

Seizures that seem to involve all of the brain are called generalized seizures.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: Mayo Foundation For Medic...

Complex focal seizures often result in staring and nonpurposeful movements

Article: Epilepsy
Source: Mayo Foundation For Medic...

Complex focal seizures. These seizures alter consciousness or awareness, causing you to lose awareness for a period of time.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: Mayo Foundation For Medic...

They may alter emotions or change the way things look, smell, feel, taste or sound. They may also result in involuntary jerking of part of the body

Article: Epilepsy
Source: Mayo Foundation For Medic...

Simple focal seizures. These seizures don't result in loss of consciousness.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: Mayo Foundation For Medic...

When seizures appear to result from abnormal activity in just one part of the brain, they're called focal or partial seizures.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: Mayo Foundation For Medic...

In most cases, a person with epilepsy will tend to have the same type of seizure each time, so the symptoms will be similar from episode to episode.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: Mayo Foundation For Medic...

Epilepsy seizures usually begin between ages 5 and 20, but they can happen at any age. There may be a family history of seizures or epilepsy.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: A.D.A.M

Common causes of epilepsy include:
Stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA)
Dementia, such as Alzheimer's disease
Traumatic brain injury
Infections, including brain abscess, meningitis, encephalitis, and AIDS
Brain problems that are present at birth (congenital brain defect)
Brain injury that occurs during or near bith
Metabolism disorders that a child may be born with (such as phenylketonuria)
Brain tumor
Abnormal blood vessels in the brain
Other illness that damage or destroy brain tissue

Article: Epilepsy
Source: A.D.A.M

Epilepsy may be due to a medical condition or injury that affects the brain, or the cause may be unknown

Article: Epilepsy
Source: A.D.A.M

Epilepsy occurs when permanent changes in brain tissue cause the brain to be too excitable or jumpy. The brain sends out abnormal signals. This results in repeated, unpredictable seizures.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: A.D.A.M

Epilepsy is a brain disorder in which a person has repeated seizures (convulsions) over time. Seizures are episodes of disturbed brain activity that cause changes in attention or behavior.

Article: Epilepsy
Source: A.D.A.M
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