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Race - Factor

Race - Factor

What role does race play in sexual attraction, and how do people of different races perceive one another in terms of romantic compatibility or desirability?

 

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M. Junaid Alam

M. Junaid Alam

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Psychology Today blogger Satoshi Kanazawa sparked a firestorm with his latest posting entitled, "A Look at the Hard Truths About Human Nature."

In it, the evolutionary psychologist at the London School of Economics argues that black women are less physically attractive than other women. The article was quickly removed from the site...

Article: Satoshi Kanazawa Causes F...
Source: Huffington Post

Empirical studies have also alluded to the association between Asians and femininity ( Cheng, 1996). When participants are asked to select group leaders, they report preferring leaders who possess masculine traits, and Asian men are the least likely to be chosen (when participants are given the choice of several racial and gender groups; Cheng, 1996). We were unable to locate any empirical research specifically examining gendered stereotypes of Asian women, but we expect that they would also be perceived as feminine.

Article:   Racial stereotypes and in…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

Judging by the laws and rhetoric of early Americans, the notion of sex across the color line struck them as repulsive, unnatural, and intolerable. White concern over the act of interracial sex can be traced to seventeenth-century colonial America. Criminalization of interracial sexual relations stood as a monument to white society's commitment to maintaining the "purity" of the white race.

The ideal of racial purity proved elusive, however, as conditions in the very early years of colonial settlement simply did not permit the absolute sexual separation of the three races: indigenous Indians, African slaves, and Europeans. The dire scarcity of European women in some regions, especially in the southern colonies, left many European American men partnering with non-European women, some merely for sex, but others in marriage. Also, during this time racial categories had not yet fully formed, so there was greater fluidity across racial lines. Some colonial historians have even claimed that full-blown racism, long associated with the American South, was inchoate in colonial America, permitting a certain degree of tolerance of interracial sexual relations that continued through the Civil War.

Article:   Encyclopedia of the New A…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

"What does it take to find a member of a different race attractive? In this research, we suggest that for Whites, attraction to Asians may be based, in part, on stereotypes and variations in Asians' racial appearance. Study 1 reveals that Asians are stereotyped as being more feminine and less masculine than other racial groups-characteristics considered appealing for women but not for men to possess," researchers in Seattle, Washington report.

Article:   Studies from University o…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

Cultural studies literature has suggested that stereotypes of Asians portray both genders as being feminine. According to Fujino (1992) and Williams (1994), Asian women are portrayed in the media as “exotic, subservient, or simply nice” ( Mok, 1999, p. 107)—all feminine traits. Asian men, in contrast, are presented as lacking in the physical appearance and social skills needed to attract women ( Mok, 1999, p. 107). In other words, they are seen as insufficiently masculine.

Article:   Racial stereotypes and in…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

In the largest study of its kind Dr Michael Lewis of Cardiff University's School of Psychology, collected a random sample of 1205 black, white, and mixed-race faces.
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Each face was then rated for their perceived attractiveness to others -- with mixed-race faces, on average, being perceived as being more attractive.

Article: Mixed-Race People Perceiv...
Source: Science Daily

Research on a major dating site between February 2009 and February 2010 by Professor Mendelsohn and his colleagues shows that more than 80 percent of the contacts initiated by white members were to other white members, and only 3 percent to black members. Black members were less rigid: they were 10 times more likely to contact whites than whites were to contact blacks.

Article: Love, Lies and What They ...
Source: New York Times
M. Junaid Alam

M. Junaid Alam

25 Knowledge Cards 

It's a fascinating paradox that the world of online dating throws open the option of reaching out to literally almost anyone, but that the same biases and prejudices that inform real-world interaction stubbornly persist. That said, the article's characterization of blacks on dating websites as "less rigid" should come with a caveat: from a numbers standpoint, you necessarily have to be less rigid about same-race dating when you are in the minority versus the majority, otherwise you're defacto rejecting a huge percentage of the dating pool.

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According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of black women who married white men tripled from 1980 to 1998, from 45,000 to 120,000.

Article: Black Women Say It's Hard...
Source: Daily Herald (Arlington H...
M. Junaid Alam

M. Junaid Alam

25 Knowledge Cards 

This presents a unique counterpoint to the prevalence of same-race dating, and shows that sometimes other factors (in this case, economics) can partially trump same-race preference.

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According to U.S. Census Bureau statistics in 2000, out of 570,919 interracial marriages, 116,000 were between White men and Black women. It's a number that continues to rise as more Black women begin to date men from other races. Black men are more likely to date, marry and cohabitate with women of a different race or culture, according to the report, at a rate more than double that of Black women and White men.

Article:   Is Love Becoming Color Bl…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal

In the largest study of its kind Dr Michael Lewis of Cardiff University's School of Psychology, collected a random sample of 1205 black, white, and mixed-race faces.

Each face was then rated for their perceived attractiveness to others -- with mixed-race faces, on average, being perceived as being more attractive.

Article: Mixed-Race People Perceiv...
Source: Science Daily
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