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Babe Ruth

Babe Ruth

George Herman Ruth, Jr., best known as "Babe" Ruth, and nicknamed "the Bambino," was an American baseball player who spent 22 seasons in Major League Baseball playing for three teams (1914–1935). Known for his hitting brilliance, Ruth set career records for home runs, slugging percentage, runs batted in and on-base plus slugging.

 

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Brittni Taylor

Brittni Taylor

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Between 1915 and 1919 he won 85 games, yielded a stunning earned run average of only 2.02, won three World Series games (one in 1916 and two in 1918), and, during a streak for scoreless World Series innings, set a record by pitching 292/3 consecutive shutout innings.

Article: Babe Ruth
Source: Britannica Online Encyclo...

He led the AL with a 1.75 ERA and nine shutouts in 1916, going 23-12 for the World Champion Red Sox, and won a career-high 24 in 1917. However, the Red Sox could not ignore the abilities of a hitter who would establish a career-record .304 batting average as a pitcher.

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Source: BaseballLibrary.com

To bankroll his Broadway ventures, Boston owner Harry Frazee sold Ruth to the Yankees prior to the 1920 season for $100,000, twice the highest price previously paid for a player. (Frazee also got a $300,000 loan.) Ruth responded by shattering his home run record with 54, and went on to break his own record twice more with 59 in 1921 and 60 in 1927.

Article: Jump to:
Source: BaseballLibrary.com

On April 27, 1947, the Yankees hosted Babe Ruth Day at Yankee Stadium. The event was held to honor the ailing baseball star, who was nearing the end of his life because of throat cancer. Ruth, the legendary “Sultan of Swat,” died a year later at age 53.

Article: April 27, 1947 | Babe Rut...
Source: The Learning Network - Th...

Sept. 30, 1934, was Babe's last game as a Yankee. In 15 years with New York, he hit an average of 43.9 home runs a season

Article: BackTalk; For Babe Ruth, ...
Source: The New York Times

On this day in 1935, Babe Ruth, one of the greatest players in the history of baseball, ends his Major League playing career after 22 seasons, 10 World Series and 714 home runs. The following year, Ruth, a larger-than-life figure whose name became synonymous with baseball, was one of the first five players inducted into the sport's hall of fame.

Article: This Day in History
Source: History

George Herman Ruth was born February 6, 1895, into a poor family in Baltimore. As a child, he was sent to St. Mary's Industrial School for Boys, a school run by Roman Catholic brothers, where he learned to play baseball and was a standout athlete.

Article: This Day in History
Source: History

The health of Ruth started to deteriorate in 1946 when it developed a malignant tumour which distributed its neck and its artery left carotid. It received many treatments during which it lost eighty books. At this moment Dr. Brian Hutchings a new drug called the teropterin had developed, which showed the improvement in patients of leukaemia.

Article: History of Babe Ruth
Source: Free Articles Directory |...

In Baltimore, Maryland, at the Camden Yards baseball park, home of the Baltimore Oriole’s professional baseball team, there is a statue of Babe Ruth, the famous New York Yankee slugger. Although he became famous as a Yankee, George Herman Ruth ( b. 1895, d. 1948) had lots of history in Baltimore

Article: The Pop History Dig » Ba...
Source: The Pop History Dig » Ba...

In 1914, Ruth was first signed to play professional baseball by the Baltimore Orioles manager Jack Dunn who had heard about his play at the St. Mary’s orphanage. The Orioles were then a minor league team, and Ruth was signed on as a 19 year-old pitcher.

Article: The Pop History Dig » Ba...
Source: The Pop History Dig » Ba...
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