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Ichiro Suzuki

Ichiro Suzuki

Ichiro Suzuki, usually known simply as Ichiro (born October 22, 1973), is a Japanese professional baseball right fielder for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball.

 

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Thomas Piscina

Thomas Piscina

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He throws with the right hand and bats with the left hand. He made his major league debut on April 2, 2001 for the Seattle Mariners and through 2008 has a batting average of 0.331, has 1797 hits, 878 runs, 468 RBIs, 315 stolen bases and a slugging percentage of 0.431.

Article: Ichiro Suzuki biography
Source: Ichiro Suzuki biography -...

He won the batting crown, Gold Glove, most hits, Rookie of the Year, and the MVP award in his rookie year. In the 2004 season, he broke George Sisler’s record for the most hits in a season. Today, Ichiro is still playing great for the Mariners, and this year reached career hit 3000 if you combine both his Japanese record and his Major League record. I was very fortunate to be in the stands in the game as he hit the first pitch of the game to left center field. So I hope I have influenced you that Ichiro is one of the best players ever to play baseball.

Article: Ichiro Suzuki Bio and Bes...
Source: Sports Card Forum Article...

Suzuki, adjudged the best-known person in Japan—even better known than Emperor Akihito, who came in second—in a popularity poll during the 1990s, ended his first two seasons in Major League Baseball with a total of 450 hits, more than any other player in major league history. In his first two seasons with the Seattle Mariners, the outfielder compiled a batting average of .336 and in 2002 collected more votes than any other American League (AL) player in balloting for the All-Star Game. Even his opponents are full of praise for Suzuki's batting power. "There's no secret way to get him out," Boston Red Sox manager Grady Little told Sports Illustrated. "All you can do is concentrate on the other eight guys."

Article: Ichiro Suzuki Biography -...
Source: JRank Articles

Suzuki, adjudged the best-known person in Japan—even better known than Emperor Akihito, who came in second—in a popularity poll during the 1990s, ended his first two seasons in Major League Baseball with a total of 450 hits, more than any other player in major league history. In his first two seasons with the Seattle Mariners, the outfielder compiled a batting average of .336 and in 2002 collected more votes than any other American League (AL) player in balloting for the All-Star Game. Even his opponents are full of praise for Suzuki's batting power. "There's no secret way to get him out," Boston Red Sox manager Grady Little told Sports Illustrated. "All you can do is concentrate on the other eight guys."

Article: Ichiro Suzuki Biography -...
Source: JRank Articles

As for the Hall of Fame while, until recently, Ichiro had been regarded as on the bubble, most metrics now are listing him as in—regardless of whether or not he gets to the 3,000 mark.

Playing all or part of your career as a Yankee has the effect of knocking a couple of years off your Hall of Fame wait time. If Ichiro gets his 3,000th hit and wins a ring, we could be looking at him being in on the first ballot.

That's not even considering the numbers Ichiro put up in Japan which, of course, it's been proven MLB doesn't.

Bottom line: Ichiro to the Yankees both benefits his 3,000 chase and his Hall of Fame chances.

Article: New York Yankees
Source: Bleacher Report

Going from worst to first, Suzuki joined the New York Yankees in a deal that sent two marginal young pitchers to Seattle.

''I am going from a team with the most losses to a team with the most wins,'' he said. ''It's hard to contain my excitement for that reason.''...In the third inning, he was given a standing ovation before his first at-bat against the only team he played for in 11 1/2 major league seasons. Suzuki tipped his batting helmet and bowed twice to the more than 29,000 in attendance.

Article: OF Ichiro Suzuki traded t...
Source: Yahoo! Sports

Ichiro Suzuki has ruled the arena of baseball in his native country, for nine years. Within the 1990s, he won the title of the most well liked face of Japan. He’s often considered a rock star, in preference to an athlete. His dressing style and response in interviews attract a number of young fans.

Article: Ichiro Suzuki Biography
Source: JeberSports.Com

Ichiro's hard work and dedication has paid off and today, the world knows him by the name 'hitting machine'. Till date, he has won many titles and honors including:

Best Nine (Japan) - Seven times (1994-2000)
Gold Glove (Japan) - Seven times (1994-2000)
MLA (Matsutaro Shoriki Award, Japan) - Two times (1994-1995)
AL (American League) Rookie of the Year Award (2001)
Topps All-Star Rookie Team (2001)
AL All-Star - Eight times (2001-2008)

Article: Ichiro Suzuki Biography
Source: Ichiro Suzuki Biography

Ichiro Suzuki was born on October 22, 1973 in Honshu, an island about 150 miles southwest of Tokyo, Japan. If Ichiro didn’t already possess an instinctive love of baseball, his father, Nobuyuki, and mother, Yoshie, made sure he developed one. Indeed, they planned for him to become a professional baseball player as soon as he entered the world.

Nobuyuki pushed the hardest. He owned a small cooler repair factory in the town of Toyoyama, but spent most of his free time watching and studying baseball. His favorite team was the Chunichi Dragons, who played in the nearby city of Nagoya. Ichiro received his first baseball and glove after his third birthday. To this day, he talks about the gifts as though they were treasures.

Article: JockBio: Ichiro Suzuki Bi...
Source: Jockbio

"There's nobody like Ichiro in either league—now or ever. He exists strictly within his own world, playing a game 100 percent unfamiliar to everyone else. The game has known plenty of 'slap' hitters, but none who sacrifice so much natural ability for the sake of the art. Maury Wills wasn't going to do anything but hit singles. Matty Alou wasn't a slugger in disguise. Ichiro, a man of wondrous strength, puts on impressive power-hitting displays almost nightly in batting practice. And he'll go deep occasionally in games, looking very much like someone who could do it again, often. Mostly, though, Ichiro is death by handkerchief. In the first inning, with lefty Mark Redman nibbling on the outside corner, Ichiro sliced a ground ball single between third and short. Next time up, with the A's perhaps leaning that way again, he singled through the other side of the diamond. The man lives for hits, little tiny ones, and the glory of standing atop the world in that category. Every spring, scouts or media types write him off, swearing that opposing pitchers have found the key, and they are embarrassingly wrong." - Bruce Jenkins in The San Francisco Chronicle (July 28, 2004)

Article: Ichiro Suzuki Quotes
Source: Ichiro Suzuki Quotes
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