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Tom Seaver

Tom Seaver

George Thomas "Tom" Seaver (born November 17, 1944), nicknamed "Tom Terrific" and "The Franchise", is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. He pitched from 1967-1986 for four different teams in his career, but is noted primarily for his time with the New York Mets.

 

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Brittni Taylor

Brittni Taylor

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He led in victories and winning percentage with a 25-7 record to win his first Cy Young Award. He was also named male athlete of the year by the Associated Press. Seaver had a 1-0 record in the league championship series and was 1-1 with a 3.00 ERA when the Mets beat the Baltimore Orioles in a five-game World Series.

Article: Sports Biographies
Source: HickokSports.com

98.8; On January 7, 1992, that was the percentage by which Tom Seaver was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. No player has ever received a higher approval rating by the Baseball Writers Association of America, not even Cobb. Few players were ever more connected as a “franchise” player than Tom Terrific with the New York Mets.

Article: SABR
Source: SABR

With only three acres planted, Seaver wine will be a small business, which fits with the desire of its proprietor. Mr. Seaver predicts the first vintage will yield about 450 cases - 5,400 bottles - the equivalent of one of the smallest of Napa's cult wineries. While plans for distributing the wine have not yet solidified, Mr. Seaver is already putting together a mailing list of potential buyers who he thinks will appreciate his efforts.

Article: Warming Up in the Vineyar...
Source: The New York Times

Twenty-four years after closing out his storied 20-year, Hall of Fame career as a member of the Red Sox, the Mets icon is far more consumed with the grapes at his GTS Vineyards than Cy Young races, pennant chases or even the miserable Mets.

Article: Tom Seaver says poor mech...
Source: Tom Seaver says poor mech...

Seaver grew up in Fresno, Calif., in the heart of the Central Valley, where his father was in the raisin business. Once, at the height of his baseball career, his brother-in-law asked him what he was going to do when it was all over.

Article: Warming Up in the Vineyar...
Source: The New York Times

"Tom Terrific" was the first genuine superstar for the New York Mets. The 6-foot-1, 205-pound right-handed pitcher joined the team in 1967 and had a 16-13 record with a 2.76 ERA. After a 16-12 mark and a 2.20 ERA in his second season, Seaver helped pitch the Mets to the NL pennant and World Series championship in 1969.

Article: Sports Biographies
Source: HickokSports.com

By age 24, Seaver had already won 57 big league games on his way to 311 victories in a 20-year pitching career. He would lead the league in victories 3 times and in ERA 3 times, and strike out 3,640 batters to rank sixth all time, leading the league in strikeouts 5 times

Article: 1960s Baseball - Player P...
Source: 1960s Baseball - Player P...

He graduated from Fresno High in 1962 and after a stint with the US marine Corp Reserve enrolled at Fresno City College. While at FCC, the Rams went 11-2 and he had an earned run average of 1.56. He attended USC and then went on to play for the New York Mets.

Article: In the News
Source: Fresno City College : In ...

Nine-year-old Tom joined the North Rotary team in the Fresno Little League as a pitcher and outfielder. Within three years, he had pitched a perfect game while batting a robust .540. Later, Seaver pitched for Fresno High, a school that had already graduated pitching luminaries Jim Maloney, Dick Ellsworth, and Dick Selma.

Article: SABR
Source: SABR

George Thomas Seaver was a franchise power pitcher who helped change the New York Mets from lovable losers into formidable foes. The quintessential professional, Tom Terrific won 311 games with a 2.86 ERA over 20 seasons and his 3,272 strikeouts set a National League record. Seaver fanned 3,640 batters in his career, including 200 or more 10 times and 19 in a single game once.

Article: Seaver, Tom
Source: Baseball Hall of Fame
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