Curated Collections of the Most Useful Facts.

What's This?
Civil Rights DBQ - 8th Grade Form C

Civil Rights DBQ - 8th Grade Form C

The goal of the Civil Rights Movement during the 1950s and 1960s was to end segregation and achieve equal rights for all citizens under United States law.

 

Curated by

Julia Ebel

Julia Ebel

11 Knowledge Cards

Views    1185

Share     twitter share  

Curated Facts

Throughout history, much of women’s work has taken place in the home rather than in the marketplace. Recent generations of women, however, have been more likely to work in the formal economy, particularly in the United States and other developed countries.

American women’s labor force participation has risen from 32 percent in 1948 to nearly 60 percent today (Chart 1). The movement of women into the workplace has slowed and perhaps even ebbed in recent years, but the wavering appears concentrated among younger women, many of whom are probably in school preparing for better-paying jobs. More than three-quarters of women ages 25 to 54—the prime working years—are in the labor force, holding a job or looking for one.

Article:   Women at Work: A Progress…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal
Julia Ebel

Julia Ebel

11 Knowledge Cards 

QUESTIONS:

1.      Provide two pieces of evidence from the sources provided above that show the role of women in society is changing.        

              

2.      What do the documents say about the kind of social presumptions made about the role in the 1950’s?  Cite examples.      

                                   

3.      What perspectives were presented in the sources above regarding the need for the government to protect women’s rights? Cite examples, and explain if you agree or disagree with this perspective or not.    

Reply

Background Information
The question of what constitutes a person’s civil rights and a government’s role in protecting them has been debated for centuries. In United States founding government documents such as the Declaration of Independence, U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights, the founding fathers tried to define the government’s role in protecting its citizens’ rights. After the civil war, slavery was put to an end and a new definition of citizens’ rights was crafted with new amendments (13th, 14th and 15th) that were added to the U.S. Constitution. However, the government’s protection of these rights became precarious when the “separate but equal” doctrine was established in the Plessy v. Ferguson Supreme Court case, which paved the way for Jim Crow laws that in turn violated the rights of African-American citizens. What ensued was a battle for government protection of those civil rights that lasted for decades, and some might suggest that battle is still being fought today.

Article:   https://www.citelighter.c…
Source:  Offline Book/Journal
Julia Ebel

Julia Ebel

11 Knowledge Cards 

PROMPT  

The goal of the Civil Rights Movement during the 1950s and 1960s was to end segregation and achieve equal rights for all citizens under United States law. With that goal in mind, to what degree was the Civil Rights Movement successful in promoting and achieving equal rights for all of United States citizens?

 

Think About:

o   What defines equality and fair treatment?

o   How do the founding documents establish role of the U.S. Government in protecting citizens’ rights?

o   How do the founding documents ignite the debate over the government’s role in protecting citizens’ rights?

o   Are there groups you know of that are protesting for the government to protect their rights today? What are their arguments? Do you agree with them?

Reply

Document A1:

In the 1960s, Americans who knew only the potential of "equal protection of the laws" expected the president, the Congress, and the courts to fulfill the promise of the 14th Amendment. In response, all three branches of the federal government--as well as the public at large--debated a fundamental constitutional question: Does the Constitution's prohibition of denying equal protection always ban the use of racial, ethnic, or gender criteria in an attempt to bring social justice and social benefits?

Document A2:

The legislation, which President Johnson signed into law the next day, outlawed literacy tests and provided for the appointment of Federal examiners (with the power to register qualified citizens to vote) in those jurisdictions that were "covered" according to a formula provided in the statute. In addition, Section 5 of the act required covered jurisdictions to obtain "preclearance" from either the District Court for the District of Columbia or the U.S. Attorney General for any new voting practices and procedures. Section 2, which closely followed the language of the 15th amendment, applied a nationwide prohibition of the denial or abridgment of the right to vote on account of race or color. The use of poll taxes in national elections had been abolished by the 24th amendment (1964) to the Constitution; the Voting Rights Act directed the Attorney General to challenge the use of poll taxes in state and local elections. In Harper v. Virginia State Board of Elections, 383 U.S. 663 (1966), the Supreme Court held Virginia's poll tax to be unconstitutional under the 14th amendment.

Article: Voting Rights Act (1965)
Source: Our Documents

Document A3:

The Civil Rights Act signed into law in April 1968–popularly known as the Fair Housing Act–prohibited discrimination concerning the sale, rental and financing of housing based on race, religion, national origin and sex. Intended as a follow-up to the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the bill was the subject of a contentious debate in the Senate, but was passed quickly by the House of Representatives in the days after the assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. The act stands as the final great legislative achievement of the civil rights era.
Advertisement

Article: Fair Housing Act of 1968
Source: Black History
Julia Ebel

Julia Ebel

11 Knowledge Cards 

Questions:  

1.      In the documents above, what rights are being protected by law? Cite at least two examples from each document.    

                         

2.      In the documents above, what examples are provided to demonstrate that the Civil Rights Movement successfully impacted the government’s role protecting civil rights by law?

                                   

3.      Where in the documents is evidence provided that the legislation passed during the Civil Rights Movement was lacking, or not sufficient to fully protect American citizens’ rights? Mark the documents.

Reply

Document B1:
The Good Wife’s Guide From Housekeeping Monthly, May 13, 1955 Reprinted

Have dinner ready. Plan ahead, even the night before, to have a delicious meal ready on time for his return. This is a way of letting him know that you have be thinking about him and are concerned about his needs. Most men are hungry when they get home and the prospect of a good meal is part of the warm welcome needed.

Article: Diversity Chronicle
Source: Diversity Chronicle

Document B2:

Women are the sole or primary breadwinners in roughly 40 percent of U.S. households nowadays. They and their families need a livable wage -- a wage that would allow them to save up for a down payment on a house, their kids' college tuition, and their own retirement security. In the richest country in the world, that's not too much to expect.

Article: Actions Speak Louder Tha...
Source: Actions Speak Louder Tha...

Document B3:

Women may be half of the workforce, but they have largely been concentrated in lower-paying service jobs like waitresses, retail workers and administrative assistants. However, they could be moving up.

Article: 20 Surprising Jobs Women ...
Source: Forbes

Document C1:

Arizona’s SB1070 raises concerns for some groups of American citizens who fear their civil rights could be violated as a result of possible racial profiling.

Article: Grade 8 DBQ Form C - DUSD...
Source: Grade 8 DBQ Form C - DUSD...

Document C2:

End Racial Profiling Acts were introduced into Congress in 2004, 2005, 2007, and 2009,134 but Congress failed to enact legislation to ban the practice.

Article: The Leadership Conference...
Source: The End Racial Profiling ...

Document C3:

My friends, as we enter a new decade, it should be clear to all of us that there is an unfinished agenda, that we have miles to go before we reach the promised land.

The men who rule this country today never learned the lessons of Dr. King, they never learned that non-violence is the only way to peace and justice.

Our nation continues to wage war upon its neighbors, and upon itself.

The powers that be rule over a racist society, filled with hatred and ignorance.

Our nation continues to be segregated along racial and economic lines.

The powers that be make themselves richer by exploiting the poor. Our nation continues to allow children to go hungry, and will not even house its own people

Article: UFW: The Official Web Pag...
Source: Ufw

Document C4:

America’s struggles with race and racism are never completely out of the news. But it is hard to remember when a series of stories have given this issue such resonance, whether in the rulings of the Supreme Court on affirmative action and voting rights, a tense trial in a Florida courtroom and even the racially insensitive comments of a celebrity chef.

Article: Citelighter is currently ...
Source: Citelighter
Julia Ebel

Julia Ebel

11 Knowledge Cards 

QUESTIONS:

1.      What issues of racial discrimination are addressed in the sources provided in Document C?      

         

2.      Based on your analysis of the documents provided in this document set, what evidence is provide about racial discrimination in America today?  For each piece of evidence, explain if you think it is sound evidence or more opinion and why you think so.                      

 

3.      To what extent does each of the sources in this document reveal about the success of the Civil Rights Movement?

Reply

Document D1:

Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 prohibits private employers, state and local governments, employment agencies and labor unions from discriminating against qualified individuals with disabilities in job application procedures, hiring, firing, advancement, compensation, job training, and other terms, conditions, and privileges of employment. The ADA covers employers with 15 or more employees, including state and local governments. It also applies to employment agencies and to labor organizations. The ADA’s nondiscrimination standards also apply to federal sector employees under section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended, and its implementing rules.

Article: Facts About the Americans...
Source: Facts About the Americans...

Document D2:

In several recent posts I’ve discussed how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires public accommodations (i.e. businesses that offer goods and services to the public) occupied prior to January 26, 1993 to only make modifications that are “readily achievable.” I’ve received a number of requests to comment on what this term means and how a business determines whether a proposed modification (or claimed ADA violation) is readily achievable. Although there are no bright lines and each situation presents its own unique factors to consider, there are a number of factors that businesses can and should consider in deciding whether they are required to commit resources to make changes or modifications to their facility.

Article: ADA Musings
Source: ADA Musings

Document D3:

By the early 1960s, calls to reform U.S. immigration policy had mounted, thanks in no small part to the growing strength of the civil rights movement. At the time, immigration was based on the national-origins quota system in place since the 1920s, under which each nationality was assigned a quota based on its representation in past U.S. census figures. The civil rights movement’s focus on equal treatment regardless of race or nationality led many to view the quota system as backward and discriminatory. In particular, Greeks, Poles, Portuguese and Italians–of whom increasing numbers were seeking to enter the U.S.–claimed that the quota system discriminated against them in favor of Northern Europeans. President John F. Kennedy even took up the immigration reform cause, giving a speech in June 1963 calling the quota system “intolerable.”

Article: U.S. Immigration Since 19...
Source: History

Document D4:

Among the most difficult civil rights issues are those facing the nation's 2.5 million Native Americans. Federally recognized tribes are considered domestic dependent nations, with their rights to tribal sovereignty preserved. Tribal sovereignty refers to tribes' right to govern themselves, define their own membership, manage tribal property, and regulate tribal business and domestic relations; it further recognizes the existence of a government-to-government relationship between such tribes and the federal government. The federal government has special trust obligations to protect tribal lands and resources, protect tribal rights to self-government, and provide services necessary for tribal survival and advancement. The fight to preserve tribal sovereignty and treaty rights has long been at the forefront of the Native American civil rights movement.

Article: Native Americans
Source: The Leadership Conference

Document D5:

Civil rights and immigration advocates applaud the reintroduction of the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act in the Senate. The bill would provide a pathway to citizenship for immigrants whose parents brought them to the United States when they were young.

Reintroduction of the legislation comes on the heels of President Barack Obama's immigration speech on Tuesday, reaffirming his commitment to immigration reform, including the passage of the DREAM Act.

“As President Obama said yesterday, immigrants have helped make this country stronger and more prosperous,” said Wade Henderson, president and CEO of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights. “And Senator Durbin’s continued leadership on the DREAM Act is a healthy signal that America will not back away from immigration reform that honors the dignity of working people, exemplifies core American values, and ensures the security and prosperity of our nation.”

The DREAM Act would allow undocumented youth who were brought to the United States before they were 15 to obtain "conditional nonimmigrant status," provided that they complete high school or get their GED, then either serve in the military, or enroll in college, for two years. Additionally, conditional nonimmigrants must be “of good moral character,” not have committed certain crimes, and pay back taxes. After 10 years of conditional status, they are eligible to apply for legal permanent resident status.

Article: Civil Rights Groups Appla...
Source: Civil Rights Groups Appla...
Julia Ebel

Julia Ebel

11 Knowledge Cards 

QUESTIONS:

1.      What does each of these sources provided in this document set reveal about the degree of success of the Civil Rights Movement?  Cite examples.                      

 

2.      Based on the sources in Document D, can government successfully promote equality? Does equality mean the same as fairness?

Reply

PROMPT

The goal of the Civil Rights Movement during the 1950s and 1960s was to end segregation and achieve equal rights for all citizens under United States law. With that goal in mind, to what degree was the Civil Rights Movement successful in promoting and achieving equal rights for all of United States citizens?



Think About:

o What defines equality and fair treatment?

o How do the founding documents establish role of the U.S. Government in protecting citizens’ rights?

o How do the founding documents ignite the debate over the government’s role in protecting citizens’ rights?

o Are there groups you know of that are protesting for the government to protect their rights today? What are their arguments? Do you agree with them? PROMPT

The goal of the Civil Rights Movement during the 1950s and 1960s was to end segregation and achieve equal rights for all citizens under United States law. With that goal in mind, to what degree was the Civil Rights Movement successful in promoting and achieving equal rights for all of United States citizens?



Think About:

o What defines equality and fair treatment?

o How do the founding documents establish role of the U.S. Government in protecting citizens’ rights?

o How do the founding documents ignite the debate over the government’s role in protecting citizens’ rights?

o Are there groups you know of that are protesting for the government to protect their rights today? What are their arguments? Do you agree with them?

Article: Civil Rights DBQ - 8th Gr...
Source: Citelighter
Player
feedback